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Two speeds of water stewardship shown from European companies

Pressmeddelanden   •   Mar 06, 2017 13:43 CET

New CDP report released today reveals that European companies need to do more towards corporate water stewardship, as disparity grows between leaders and laggards

  • While European companies make up 12 of the 25 2016 Water A-List, 58% of water exposed companies failed to disclose water-related data despite growing investor demand for transparency;
  • 36% of responding companies report exposure to water risks in operations and supply chain, but with fewer than half of respondents having conducted assessments on this scale, this figure is likely undervalued;
  • Leading investors, Amundi Asset Management and Nordea Asset Management highlight the ever-growing need for transparency to help evaluate the water risks within their portfolios;
  • Companies such as Metsä Board and L’Oréal have reported water-related opportunities in terms of cost savings and increased brand value.

March 6, 2016: A new report titled "Catching up with the leaders: Accelerating corporate water stewardship in Europe" analyzed water-related data from 121 European companies. It reveals a growing disparity between the few leading companies and those who are lagging in key areas of water management, creating risk for themselves as well as investors.

Given that the EU is already looking to integrate the SDGs into its policy framework and current priorities of the European Commissioni, regulatory requirements will present opportunities to companies who can advance progress on the goals, while initially posing regulatory risk to those that are under-prepared.

Backed by 634 investors globally with €65 trillion in assets, this report highlights companies’ performance across five key metrics including transparency, risk assessment, measuring and monitoring, governance and strategy, and engagement and response.

European companies perform well when it comes to water governance issues with 76% of European companies reporting board level management, however increased disclosure on water-related issues, conducting risk assessments beyond direct operations and engaging with stakeholders is necessary to ensure future water security.

Key Findings from the Nordics:

There is strong push towards environmental stewardship at the governmental and investor level within this region, with NBIM being a lead sponsor of CDP’s Water program and Sweden recently proposing the world’s most ambitious climate change goals. While the report’s data indicates that responding companies reflect this awareness, there is a concerning overall lack of disclosure and engagement with suppliers.  

Transparency: With a response rate of 28%, this region has the lowest disclosure within Europe, however three quarters of companies who did respond are aware of the linkages between water use and other environmental issues

Targets: Metsä Board is in the process of tightening its process water usage targets after having almost reached its 2020 targets of a 17% decrease from 2010

Risks: SCA is one of the few respondents in this region which extends its risk assessments to suppliers, requiring water use and discharge information covering all its purchases of pulp, paper and chemicals

Opportunities: ASSA ABLOY recognizes a positive linkage between recirculated water, water usage and energy consumption

Collective ActionHolmen AB, worked with local farmers in its Workington mill in the UK while developing a bio-mass fired heat and power plant to encourage them to grow willow on marginal land to supply feedstock,in turnproviding long term jobs, mitigating flood risks and improving water quality by reducing excess run-off

A-List Companies

Metsä Board

Quote from Morgan Gillespy, Head of CDP Water Program:

While we celebrate the high representation of European leaders on CDP’s Water A-List, our analysis confirms the two speeds of water stewardship shown from European companies. It is impossible to ignore the growing gap between those leading water stewardship efforts and those companies being left behind. Whilst European companies perform well in governance of water issues, they must improve in reporting on key issues relating to water management, particularly as investors are calling for more detail. The latter will need to address these issues particularly as governments and competitors look to implement and benefit from the Paris Agreement.”

Quote from Nordea Asset Management:

“The feedback from companies has been positive, and a number of corporate and industry actions have been initiated. However, for us and other investors to be able to assess actions and performance related to water issues we need better water-related data. We expect more companies to report, and ask their suppliers to report, on their water management via CDP.”

For further examples of how investors used CDP data, please see our Better Information, Better Investments case studies publication.

European A-List Companies

Consumer Discretionary

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V. (Italy)

Consumer Staples

Coca-Cola European Partners (UK)

Diageo plc (UK)

L’Oréal S.A. (France)

Unilever plc (UK)

Health Care

AstraZeneca (UK)

Bayer AG (Germany)

GlaxoSmithKline (UK)

Materials

BASF SE (Germany)

Metsä Board (Finland)

Utilities

Acciona S.A. (Spain)

Centrica (UK)

To download CDP’s latest European Water report please click here.

Notes to Editor

For more information or for exclusive interviews with the CDP team, please contact:

Joshua Snodin, Communications Officer Europe, joshua.snodin@cdp.net

About CDP

CDP Europe is part of the CDP worldwide network. CDP, formerly Carbon Disclosure Project, is an international, not-for-profit organization providing the global system for companies, cities, states and regions to measure, disclose, manage and share vital information on their environmental performance. CDP, voted number one climate research provider by investors, works with 827 institutional investors with assets of €94 trillion and 89 purchasing organisations with a combined annual spend of over €2.2 trillion, to motivate companies to disclose their impacts on the environment and natural resources and take action to reduce them. Some 5,800 companies, representing close to 60% global market capitalization, thereof nearly 1,200 in continental Europe, disclosed environmental information through CDP in 2016. CDP now holds the most comprehensive collection globally of primary corporate environmental data and puts these insights at the heart of strategic business, investment and policy decisions. Please visit www.cdp.net or follow us @CDP to find out more.

###

Carbon Disclosure Project, CDP, är ett samarbete mellan 827 institutionella investerare. CDP genomför världens största kartläggning av storföretagens ambitioner i klimat- och vattenfrågor, och att minska skövlingen av tropisk skog. Ett nordiskt sekretariat för CDP bildades år 2006 med säte i Stockholm. I år 2016 utfrågas över 250 nordiska företag om deras klimatpåverkan.

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Suppliers report 434 million tonnes of emissions reductions as big buyers flex purchasing muscle

Pressmeddelanden   •   Jan 24, 2017 07:51 CET

  • Reductions greater than France’s annual emissions disclosed by suppliers worldwide in 2016;
  • Big buyers recognized for driving change in the supply chain include General Motors Company, Sky plc and Sony Corporation;
  • Companies can do more with their buying clout with only 22% working with their suppliers to reduce emissions and 16% engaging on water use;
  • Despite US$12.4 billion cost savings, suppliers failing to capitalize on low-carbon opportunities with fewer than half setting climate targets.

24 January, 2017: As the global economy moves towards implementation of its new climate goals, the world’s largest purchasing organizations are using their buying clout to drive down emissions across their supply chains.

The Missing link: Harnessing the power of purchasing for a sustainable futurereport from CDP, written in partnership with BSR and the Carbon Trust, reveals that reductions equivalent to 434 million tonnes of carbon dioxide – more than France’s total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 2014[i] – were achieved by suppliers worldwide in 2016.

The reductions were disclosed to CDP, the not-for-profit global environmental data platform, at the request of 89 of the world’s largest purchasing organizations, including BMW, Johnson & Johnson, Microsoft and Walmart. These 89 big buyers wield a combined purchasing power of US$2.7 trillion.

The Paris Agreement on climate change, now in international law, requires global GHG emissions to be reduced to net zero well before the end of the century. With supply chains responsible for on average four times a company’s direct emissions, they are a critical focus area for global corporations seeking to avoid the risks and capitalize on the opportunities presented by the low-carbon transition.

The new report – which includes commentary from McKinsey & Company – also reveals the names of the 29 companies awarded a position on CDP’s first ever supplier engagement leader board. Selected from over 3,300 companies that were assessed, they are recognized as leaders for their work with suppliers to reduce emissions and lower climate-related risks in the supply chain.

They include:

  • Braskem S/A: The Brazilian petrochemical company runs targeted workshops with its suppliers, which provide training and technical support on identifying opportunities to reduce emissions and lower costs. Nearly 44% of emissions outside Braskem’s direct control (scope 3) are now reported to the company.
  • Hewlett-Packard: The American IT company has helped its suppliers avoid 800,000 tonnes of CO2e emissions and save more than US$65 million through development of energy-saving action plans targeting local efficiency improvements.
  • Royal Philips: The Dutch technology company identifies so-called ‘risk suppliers’ that it targets for participation in its numerous supplier sustainability programs. It has also developed a tool to help suppliers with less experience in disclosure to quantify their carbon emissions.

Dexter Galvin, Head of Supply Chain, CDP said: “We congratulate the 29 leading companies that are using their buying clout to drive change across their supply chains. Companies have a critical role to play in delivering on the Paris Agreement, and as well as setting their own house in order, it is essential they turn their attention to the risks and opportunities outsourced to their supply chain.”

“By harnessing their purchasing power, big buyers have the potential to deliver the large-scale, rapid change that is needed and lead the way towards our sustainable future.”

Nicola Kimm, Head of Sustainability, Philips Lighting said: “We are delighted to be recognised as global leaders for our work driving down emissions and improving efficiency in our supply chain. Lower emissions in the supply chain isn’t just about helping the environment, it’s a business imperative which boosts our competitive advantage and builds our resilience for a low carbon future.”

The report, which analyses climate and water-related data disclosed by more than 4,300 companies, also indicates that the sustainability commitments and practices of leading organizations are not being replicated at scale downwards through the supply chain. Despite a 20% increase since 2015 in the number of big buyers requesting climate and water-related data from their suppliers, this is not translating into downstream action, with only 22% of responding companies currently engaging with their own suppliers on carbon emissions and 16% engaging with their suppliers on water use.

Common barriers to engagement include companies’ lack of experience in calculating and managing their own emissions, a perceived lack of leverage over business partners, costs associated with managing an engagement program and an absence of mandatory requirements from customers or regulation.

Where companies are proactively engaging with their suppliers, they face a serious lack of transparency, with nearly half (47%) of suppliers not responding to their customers’ requests for climate and water-related disclosure.

The data also reveal that suppliers are failing to capitalize on the myriad opportunities presented by the low-carbon transition. While they reported a combined US$12.4 billion in savings from emissions reduction projects, fewer than half (47%) have set climate targets and just 34% reported achieving a decrease in emissions in the past year. Only one quarter of respondents are realizing climate opportunities by enabling their own suppliers to reduce emissions, or growing revenue through sales of low-carbon products or services.

Tara Norton, Managing Director, BSR, said: “Large buyers have a tremendous opportunity to catalyze supplier climate action, both through addressing the drivers of inaction and by elevating and rewarding those suppliers that demonstrate leadership. This year’s report provides practical insights on how buyers can partner with suppliers for mutual benefit, including facilitating access to tools and resources that enable emissions reductions, providing incentives for good performance, and supporting suppliers to improve climate risk management, including setting science-based targets.”

The report contains a four-part framework, developed by the Carbon Trust, for companies to catalyze change within their supply chains. The framework sets out the journey to cascading sustainability throughout the supply chain, from understanding the risks and opportunities, to planning and taking action to embed sustainability within procurement processes.

Tom Delay, Chief Executive, Carbon Trust, said: “Supply chain is the next frontier in sustainability. Managing the environmental impact of your own operations is expected behaviour. But the greatest opportunities for reductions are typically outside of direct operational control, in the supply chain. While some are showing what can be done today, the majority do not yet have a clear understanding of how to measure their impact or find the value in working with suppliers. Large public and private sector organizations can deliver change at the scale and speed required to address the challenges of climate change and resource scarcity. We hope that our insight and the examples from the leaders engaged with CDP help to accelerate the shift to a more sustainable, low carbon economy.”


**Ends**

NOTES TO EDITORS

Supplier engagement leader board

The 29 companies recognized on CDP’s supplier engagement leader board are:

3M Company

AkzoNobel

Bank of America

Bic

BNY Mellon

Braskem S/A

Bridgestone Corporation

BT Group

Coca-Cola European Partners

Creative Group of Industries

Deutsche Telekom AG

EMC Corporation

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV

General Mills Inc.

General Motors Company

Hewlett-Packard

Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha, Ltd.

Komatsu Ltd.

KPMG UK

Mitsubishi Electric Corporation

Nestlé

Panasonic Corporation

Royal Philips

Sky plc

Sony Corporation

Stora Enso Oyj

thyssenkrupp AG

Toshiba Corporation

Yokohama Rubber Company, Limited

About CDP

CDP, formerly Carbon Disclosure Project, is an international, not-for-profit organization providing the global system for companies, cities, states and regions to measure, disclose, manage and share vital information on their environmental performance. CDP, voted number one climate researchprovider by investors, works with 827 institutional investors with assets of US$100 trillion and 89 purchasing organisations with a combined annual spend of over US$2.7 trillion, to motivate companies to disclose their impacts on the environment and natural resources and take action to reduce them. Some 5,800 companies, representing close to 60% global market capitalization, disclosed environmental information through CDP in 2016. CDP now holds the most comprehensive collection globally of primary corporate environmental data and puts these insights at the heart of strategic business, investment and policy decisions. Please visit www.cdp.net/ or follow us @CDP to find out more.

About BSR

BSR is a global nonprofit organization that works with its network of more than 250 member companies and other partners to build a just and sustainable world. From its offices in Asia, Europe, and North America, BSR develops sustainable business strategies and solutions through consulting, research, and cross-sector collaboration. Visit www.bsr.org for more information about BSR’s 25 years of leadership in sustainability.

About Carbon Trust

The Carbon Trust is an independent, expert partner of leading organisations around the world, helping them contribute to and benefit from a more sustainable future. This work includes advising businesses, governments and the public sector on their opportunities in a sustainable, low carbon world;measuring and certifying the environmental footprint of organisations, supply chains and products; and developing and deploying low carbon technologies and solutions, from energy efficiency to renewable power.

The Carbon Trust has about 180 staff of 30 different nationalities, based in the UK, China, Mexico, Brazil, South Africa and the USA. The Carbon Trust’s experts come from a wide range of professional backgrounds, including engineering, business, policy and academia.

www.carbontrust.com

@thecarbontrust

For media information:

Sarah Savage, Communications manager // +44 (0) 203 818 3913 // +44 (0) 7910 706 786 // sarah.savage@cdp.net

The report will be live at the following URL from 00:01 EST/05:01 GMT Tuesday, January 24 2017: https://www.cdp.net/en/research/global-reports/global-supply-chain-report-2017.

Carbon Disclosure Project, CDP, är ett samarbete mellan 827 institutionella investerare. CDP genomför världens största kartläggning av storföretagens ambitioner i klimat- och vattenfrågor, och att minska skövlingen av tropisk skog. Ett nordiskt sekretariat för CDP bildades år 2006 med säte i Stockholm. I år 2016 utfrågas över 250 nordiska företag om deras klimatpåverkan.

New report from CDP looks at how the world’s largest purchasing organizations are using their buying clout to drive down emissions and costs across their supply chains. Analysing climate and water-related data disclosed by over 4,300, it reveals that suppliers achieved reductions equivalent to France’s 2014 emissions last year, resulting in cost savings of US$12.4 billion

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Oil & gas majors reveal transatlantic divide in efforts to meet Paris targets

Pressmeddelanden   •   Nov 22, 2016 08:01 CET

New ‘In the pipeline’ report reveals European companies investing more in low-carbon technologies and shifting towards gas, as US companies risk being left behind

  • Emissions footprint of oil and gas industry and its products account for approximately 50% of global CO2 emissions[1];
  • European majors outperform their US peers in the shift to gas, investments in low-carbon technologies and on wider climate governance and strategy;
  • Current business models continue to rely heavily on finding and proving reserves. Traditional industry performance metrics (and their interpretations) potentially outdated with peak oil demand on horizon;
  • Investors may be at risk as companies are currently only obligated to report proved reserves[2], with limited insight into how sensitive estimates are to oil price volatility;
  • Statoil, Eni and Total are best performing companies on carbon-related metrics relative to the peers; Suncor, ExxonMobil, and Chevron rank lowest of companies assessed.


November 22, 2016: A new report, analyzing a US$1.2tn[3] grouping of the world’s major publicly-listed international oil and gas companies reveals a transatlantic divide as European companies outperform their US peers in preparedness for a low-carbon future by beginning to invest in alternative energy sources and shifting to gas.

The oil and gas industry, and the use of its products, accounts for approximately 50% of global CO2 emissions. Climate policies and disruptive technology affecting the use of hydrocarbon products in transport and utilities sectors will require the oil and gas industry to rapidly adapt in order to future proof their business.

The report fromCDP – voted no. 1 climate change research provider by institutional investors– finds that the industry needs better capital discipline to secure its place in a low-carbon future through lowering its cost base or returning capital to shareholders. The research also reveals that the absence of robust data on probable and possible reserves is a significant loss of valuable information to investors looking to compare asset portfolio risk across companies.

Tarek Soliman, Senior Analyst, Investor Research at CDP said:

“On both sides of the Atlantic international oil and gas majors need to look at how they fit into an energy system which achieves the climate goals laid out in the Paris Agreement. Our research shows that European companies have been more active in developing transition strategies for the coming decade - which is expected to feature peak oil demand, and are starting to implement these. But more needs to be done across the board by oil and gas companies in exploring their future options, and investors will want to monitor this through more thorough and consistent disclosure.”

Meryam Omi, Head of Sustainability and Responsible Investment Strategy at LGIM, said:

“It is vital that the O&G sector aligns itself to the global goal of transitioning to a low carbon economy. There is an inevitable divergence in their commitments and transparency, which this report demonstrates. LGIM, will be using many of the findings to guide its overall engagement strategy with this sector."

Today’s report benchmarks oil and gas company performance on climate issues and finds that Statoil, Eni and Total are the best performing companies on carbon-related metrics relative to peers, with Suncor, ExxonMobil and Chevron ranking lowest among those who disclose to CDP.

CDP’s summary League Table for oil and gas companies and the executive summary of the report can be viewed in here.

Other findings from the report include:

  • Uncertain future:oil and gas majors face key short and long term decisions to secure their future business models, including improving capital discipline and rebalancing portfolios in the coming years and considering wider diversification or managed decline over the next decades.
  • Regulation: theoil and gas industry will be impacted by regulatory action affecting demand in the downstream sectors which it supplies. This includes automobile fleet emissions for oil and emission reduction targets and carbon pricing for gas use in electricity generation.
  • Operational efficiency: this remains an issue in the industry with the eleven companies in the study losing on average 6% of their natural gas production through flaring and methane venting and leakages. Resource management will affect demand for the industry’s products in their downstream use, for example the lifecycle carbon emissions gains of natural gas over coal in electricity generation can be eroded as a result of methane leakage (during extraction and transportation).
  • Executive remuneration packages: these are currently heavily weighted to reward company performance on hydrocarbon production levels and reserve replacement indicators (only five companies currently have detailed climate-linked performance metrics).
  • Water: 40% of onshore oil and gas upstream production is currently located in areas of medium or high water stress yet company disclosure remains behind other sectors facing similar risks.
  • Saudi Aramco, Rosneft and PetroChina: which collectively represent over US$240bn in market capitalization[4], did not respond to CDP’s 2016 climate change questionnaire and are therefore not included in this report. Investors should ask these companies why they are not providing transparency on their carbon risks.

Paul Simpson, CEO of CDP, said: "The oil and gas sector and its products contribute to approximately half of the world's CO2 emissions. This is an industry for investors to watch carefully in terms of climate risk and technology change. Mark Carney’s Taskforce on Climate related Financial Disclosure (TCFD) is expected to release its findings in December which will likely catalyze increased investor calls for full disclosures from oil and gas companies. There are reasons to be optimistic, some oil and gas majors have the balance sheets to transition to much lower carbon business models and play a key role in implementing the goals of the Paris Agreement."

- ENDS –

Notes to editor

For more information or for exclusive interviews with the CDP team, please contact:

Scope and methodology: Full details of the scope of the report and methodology used are included in the Executive Summary of the report [link]

About CDP and this report

About CDP

CDP, formerly Carbon Disclosure Project, is an international, not-for-profit organization providing the global system for companies, cities, states and regions to measure, disclose, manage and share vital information on their environmental performance. CDP, voted number one climate research provider by investors, works with 827 institutional investors with assets of US$100 trillion and 89 purchasing organizations with a combined annual spend of over US$2.7 trillion, to motivate companies to disclose their impacts on the environment and natural resources and take action to reduce them. More than 5,600 companies, representing close to 60% global market capitalization, disclosed environmental information through CDP in 2015. CDP now holds the most comprehensive collection globally of primary corporate environmental data and puts these insights at the heart of strategic business, investment and policy decisions. Please visit www.cdp.net/or follow us @CDPto find out more.

The report

This research is part of a series of award winning in-depth sector analysis by CDP to provide investors with the most comprehensive environmental data analysis. It aims to identify the most material metrics for each specific sector and how they link to financial performance. It is unique in that the weighting assigned to each metric is transparent and can be adjusted according to investor preference. Each of these metrics can provide a league in itself but the over-arching research reveals a League Table – combining all metrics. These rankings are not intended to identify definitive winners and losers for investment purposes, but rather to indicate strategic advantage in an industry where there is a significant regulatory impact on all major markets.

Reports on the steel, cement, automotive, electric utilities and chemicals and mining industries were released in 2015 and 2016.

[1] Based on IEA and EDGAR estimates, and accounting for estimated downstream Scope 3 emissions from use of sold products

[2]Companies disclose reserves in accordance with strict criteria outlined by SEC

[3]Based on 2015 average market capitalization

[4] This figure applies to Rosneft and PetroChina as Saudi Aramco is not publicly listed.

CDP (Carbon Disclosure Project), är ett samarbete mellan 827 institutionella investerare. CDP genomför världens största kartläggning av storföretagens ambitioner i klimat- och vattenfrågor, och att minska skövlingen av tropisk skog. Ett nordiskt sekretariat för CDP bildades år 2006 med säte i Stockholm. I år 2016 utfrågas över 250 nordiska företag om deras klimatpåverkan.

New ‘In the pipeline’ report reveals European companies investing more in low-carbon technologies and shifting towards gas, as US companies risk being left behind

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COMPANIES NOT MOVING FAST ENOUGH TO ADDRESS GROWING WATER RISK

Pressmeddelanden   •   Nov 15, 2016 06:01 CET

15 November, 2016: Drought, flooding, increased water stress fueled by climate change, tightening environmental regulation and the cost of cleaning up water pollution and fines have all resulted in US$14 billion worth of water-related financial impacts to business. This is over five times the US$2.6 billion reported last year by companies providing information to investors on their management of and impacts on water resources.

These are the findings of a new report from CDP, the global non-profit tracking corporate environmental performance, published at COP22 in Marrakesh today. The report, Thirsty business: Why water is vital to climate action, is based on data provided by 607 companies in response to CDP’s request for information made on behalf of 643 institutional investors with US$67 trillion in assets. It reveals:

  • ØYear-on-year trends show company progress is almost stagnant: The report evaluates corporate performance over five key metrics relating to water management, including measuring and monitoring use, reporting and target-setting. Year-on-year trends show company progress is almost stagnant, for example 61% of companies say they track their water use – just 3% more than did last year. While companies have made progress on transparency – 2016 saw the largest response yet to CDP’s annual request for investment-relevant information on water – over half (677) of the companies asked to disclose by investors failed to do so.
  • ØWater risks are rapidly materializing for business: Nearly every business sector analyzed in the report saw an increase in water-related financial impacts this year. Utilities, materials and energy companies disclosed the most substantive impacts. The increase was largely driven by Japanese power giant Tepco, who disclosed that nearly US$10 billion was spent in the past financial year addressing groundwater pollution from the Daiichi nuclear power plant following the 2011 tsunami.
  • For some companies the impacts were a significant proportion of their business: Water supply disruption to their mines cost African Rainbow Minerals US$26 million in lost revenues last year, over a third of its annual income. In total, over a quarter (164) of companies experienced detrimental impacts from water in the past year alone. And companies expect over half (54%) of the 4,416 water risks they identified to materialize in the next six years.
  • ØWater could make – or break – global efforts to implement the Paris Agreement: Companies will need to get a handle on water management in order to achieve their climate goals. Analysis reveals one in four (24%) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction activities reported by companies depend on a stable supply of water. However, better management of water could enable companies to reduce their carbon emissions. More than half of companies said more efficient use of water has led to lower GHG emissions.

CDP’s CEO Paul Simpson says: “This year’s findings offer two clear lessons for the private sector. Firstly, that water risks can rip the rug from right under business, posing a serious threat to bottom lines. Secondly, and crucially, that water will be a fundamental global commodity in the transition to a low-carbon economy. Every drop of clean, sustainable water will be essential for the emissions reduction activities countries and companies have planned. This is a wake-up call to companies everywhere to take water more seriously.”

For the second year in a row, CDP and sustainability firm South Pole Group have scored companies on their environmental management and governance of water and published CDP’s Water A List – an index of companies who are judged to be following best practice in the field of sustainable water management. In a sign that a growing number of companies are taking a more comprehensive approach to water management, 24 companies were named on the CDP Water A List this year, up from the eight named in 2015. This year’s Water A List includes BASF SE, Coca-Cola European Partners, L’Oréal and Suntory Beverage & Food. Six firms have made it to the A List for the second year running, including Colgate Palmolive Company, Ford Motor Company and Toyota Motor Corporation.

Companies who did not respond to the investor request for data received an F, denoting failure to disclose. The energy sector continues to be the laggard industry on water transparency, with only 29% of those companies requested to disclose providing information to their investors via CDP this year. The report highlights Exxon Mobile Corporation, Chevron Corporation, Royal Dutch Shell as the three largest energy companies (by market capitalization) who, since 2012, have consistently failed to respond to investor requests for disclosure through CDP’s water program.

CDP’s report shows the energy sector is exposed to water risks: Nearly half of the companies who did respond (47%) were subject to fines or penalties for incidents ranging from spills to settlements over contravening environmental regulation. The fines accrued to US$78 million, significantly higher than any other sector analyzed in the report, and over seven times the amount energy companies disclosed having to pay last year.

Morgan Gillespy, the report lead author and CDP’s head of water, says: “For a long time companies have taken water for granted as a free and plentiful resource. But these assumptions are unraveling as the impacts of climate change gather pace. From the US$100 billion worth of energy infrastructure at risk from rising sea levels in Louisiana to Chinese industry facing tightening restrictions on water use, investors are right to worry about the impacts of water risks on their assets.

There are reasons to be hopeful however. The growing list of companies on our Water A List is testament to the fact that many executives have understood the value in better water management and are seeking to raise the bar. And, as our report shows, this will make all the difference to companies working to fulfil their carbon reduction potential and the sustainable development goals.” 



Ends



Notes to editors

CDP’s 2016 water-related corporate data is now available to view on our water data microsite. This includes case studies and regional stats based on the data disclosed by 1,412 firms to institutional investors and to purchasing organizations through CDP’s supply chain program.

CDP’s Water A List 2016 are:

ACCIONA S.A., Spain

Anglo American Platinum, South Africa

BASF SE, Germany

Bayer AG, Germany

Centrica, UK

Coca-Cola European Partners, US

Colgate Palmolive Company, US

Diageo plc, UK

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV, Italy

Ford Motor Company, US

GlaxoSmithKline, UK

Harmony Gold Mining Co Ltd, South Africa

KAO Corporation, Japan

Kirin Holdings Co Ltd, Japan

Kumba Iron Ore, South Africa

L’Oréal, France

LG Display, South Korea

Metsä Board, Finland

Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Japan

Royal Bafokeng Platinum Ltd, South Africa

Sony Corporation, Japan

Suntory Beverage & Food, Japan

Toyota Motor Corporation, Japan

Unilever, UK

CDP’s water score is an indicator of a company's commitment to transparency around their environmental risks, and the sufficiency of their response to them. CDP’s water score is based solely on activities and positions disclosed in their CDP response. More information about CDP’s scoring can be found here.

Scoring of company responses were undertaken by the South Pole Group.

Carbon Disclosure Project, CDP, är ett samarbete mellan 827 institutionella investerare. CDP genomför världens största kartläggning av storföretagens ambitioner i klimat- och vattenfrågor, och att minska skövlingen av tropisk skog. Ett nordiskt sekretariat för CDP bildades år 2006 med säte i Stockholm. I år 2016 utfrågas över 250 nordiska företag om deras klimatpåverkan.

• Annual tracking study shows water-related impacts cost business US$14 billion this year; • Findings reveal poor water management could stop companies achieving 24% of their carbon cutting plans; • Major brands Ford, Toyota and Unilever among 24 corporations named in 2016 CDP Water A List for implementing best-practice strategies.

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STEEL COMPANIES NEED TECH TRANSFORMATION AS WORLD GETS TOUGH ON EMISSIONS

Pressmeddelanden   •   Okt 06, 2016 06:21 CEST

  • Steel industry accounts for 7% of global emissions and has made no progress to reduce emissions in a decade[1];
  • Industry needs a technological transformation that will reduce its emissions per tonne of steel produced over 70% by 2050 in order to meet Paris Agreement objectives[2];
  • 70% of steel industry will face a price on carbon by end of 2017, increasing risks for steelmakers that do not reduce their emissions;
  • POSCO, SSAB and Hyundai Steel are best performing companies on carbon-related metrics; Tata Steel and US Steel rank lowest of companies we were able to assess;
  • China produces 50% of steel globally and will become subject to a carbon price in 2017, but of the 15 largest Chinese steelmakers, representing 40% of China’s steel produced, only one publicly discloses its greenhouse gas emissions.

October 6, 2016: A new report, analyzing a US$121bn[3] grouping of the world’s largest steel companies, has found the industry needs to reduce its emissions by over 70% by 2050 in order to meet Paris Agreement objectives, but that progress on research and development (R&D) in emerging decarbonization technologies is limited and at early stages. With low industry profitability, R&D expenses have been cut by 14% in US$ terms in recent years and there are no commercially available technologies today which can achieve these targets. The threat to the industry is urgent as over 70% of world steel production will be subject to a carbon price by the end of 2017.

The report fromCDP – voted no. 1 climate change research provider by institutional investorsand winner of Investment Week’s Best SRI Research 2016 – reveals that there has been no industry-wide progress in improving emissions and energy efficiency levels in a decade with all emissions reduction targets set to expire by 2020. The steel industry is responsible for 6-7% of global emissions, yet the report finds that of the 14 global steel companies analyzed, over 40% (six) have not published any emissions reduction targets beyond 2016.

Drew Fryer, Senior Analyst, Investor Research at CDP said:

The steel industry will have to play a huge part in achieving the 2-degree scenario laid out in the Paris Agreement. However, there has been no progress in reducing its emissions over the past decade. Steelmakers need to prioritize funding of a technology transformation to reduce emissions in order to ensure targets are met. In particular, progress has been too slow to realize the potential of carbon capture and storage (CCS), with no pilot projects underway in the steel industry.”

Today’s report benchmarks leading steel companies on their management of climate issues finding South Korean firms POSCO and Hyundai Steel among the best performing, with Tata Steel and US Steel ranking lowest among those who disclose.

Other findings from the report include:

  • Over 70% of world steel production will be subject to a carbon price by end 2017, including from emissions trading schemes, carbon taxes or climate-focused coal taxes. Without success in realizing the potential of breakthrough low emissions technologies, steelmakers could face a continuously rising burden of carbon permit obligations;
  • The industry’s progress in reducing emissions is inconsistent. More companies increased their emissions intensities than reduced them in the past seven years, with no industry-wide progress to improve energy efficiency in a decade;
  • Only eight companies in the report have outlined emissions reduction targets. All those will expire by 2020. Six out of 14 companies in our sample have not published any forward looking targets, or have targets that expire in 2016;
  • By 2030, 20% of sites assessed are projected be in water high risk areas and 8% in extremely high risk areas[4] This could cause future business interruption exacerbated by climate change;
  • China makes up 50% of global steelmaking production but is not providing investors with the carbon-related disclosures they require to assess individual company risk and preparedness, and make informed investment decisions;
  • The steel industry is generally supportive of carbon regulation but has obstructed it in practice, arguing it could create inconsistencies between regions with and without carbon prices. However, debate between industry and regulators over ‘carbon leakage’ could enter a new phase as more countries introduce carbon prices including China;
  • Wuhan Iron and Steel, Nucor Corporation, Novolipetsk Steel OJSC, Steel Authority of India, Inner Mongolian Baotou Steel Union and SeverStal PAO which collectively represent over US$60 billion in market capitalization, did not respond to CDP’s 2016 climate change questionnaire and are therefore not included in this report. Investors should ask these companies why they are not providing transparency on their carbon emissions.

You can view the executive summary of the report, including a league table, in here.

[1]Based on figures reported by the World Steel Association

[2] The sectoral decarbonization approach (SDA) suggests the need for an emissions intensity reduction of over 70% by the steel industry by 2050 to achieve 2 degrees

[3]Based on 2015 average market cap

[4]According to our analysis using WRI Aqueduct

Carbon Disclosure Project, CDP, är ett samarbete mellan 827 institutionella investerare. CDP genomför världens största kartläggning av storföretagens ambitioner i klimat- och vattenfrågor, och att minska skövlingen av tropisk skog. Ett nordiskt sekretariat för CDP bildades år 2006 med säte i Stockholm. I år 2016 utfrågas över 250 nordiska företag om deras klimatpåverkan.

CDP's new ‘Nerves of Steel’ report reveals how carbon pricing and stalled progress on decarbonization technologies will put steel industry through the mill

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Cities Eye Economic Potential in Partnering with Business on Climate Action

Pressmeddelanden   •   Okt 04, 2016 09:03 CEST

4 October, 2016: From Athens to Abuja, Stockholm to São Paulo, cities around the world are self-disclosing through non-profit CDP that the emergence of the low-carbon economy presents significant economic opportunity to collaborate with business, develop new industry sectors and build resilience.

This year 533 cities disclosed climate-related data through CDP, formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project. The vast majority of these cities identified over 1,000 economic opportunities linked to climate change, including 299 cities who are looking to develop new business industries, such as clean tech.

London, UK, discloses that the low-carbon market is worth at least US$33 billion to the city’s economy, and is among the cities seeking to grow new industries. Similarly, San Francisco, USA has identified economic potential from collaboration: “San Francisco would not have been able to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions without working collaboratively with numerous environmental partners including our business community,” says Mayor Ed Lee. “By working closely with businesses on sustainable initiatives and financing options, we have created new jobs, catalyzed new markets, and spurred new technologies, all while showing that climate action and a thriving economy can go hand-in-hand.”

This year’s disclosures also reveal that many cities are already actively looking to partner with the private sector on climate change: cities highlighted a total 720 climate change-related projects, worth a combined US$26 billion, that they want to work with business on. Cities in Africa, North America and Latin America show the greatest appetite for private sector collaboration, where 72%, 62% and 54% of cities respectively report seeking partnerships.

Examples include:

  • Cape Town in South Africa seeking private sector collaboration on renewable energy projects, including schemes to enable companies to purchase wind generated electricity via Green Energy Certificates;
  • Denver, USA is seeking business involvement on finding new or emerging technologies that could enable it to lower energy consumption within its existing municipal energy portfolio; And
  • Quito, in Ecuador, is seeking US$800 million to deliver a waste management and water project that incorporates renewable electricity generation from three hydropower plants, with an installed capacity of 40 MW.

The findings feature in It takes a city: The case for collaborative climate action, a new report published by CDP and AECOM, and sponsored by Bloomberg Philanthropies, today. The report examines the emerging business case for city governments to collaborate with companies, investors and regional governments on addressing climate change.

Other key findings illustrate the potential for collaborative climate action between cities and business:

  • Cities that collaborate with business are more likely to have an emissions reduction targets. Of the 190 cities with a GHG emissions reduction target, 74% are working with business; and
  • The development of new businesses and industries was the most commonly cited economic opportunity by cities this year; and
  • The top three climate-related project areas that cities are seeking private sector collaboration on are: energy efficiency/retrofits, renewable energy and transport.

Action by cities will be essential to achieving the ambitious goals of the Paris Agreement. Encouragingly more than 7,000 cities have made commitments through the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate & Energy, the largest global coalition of cities on climate. Research by the C40 Cities’ Climate Leadership Group, featured in today’s report, highlights that in 75% of the cases where cities are prevented from taking climate action, collaboration with partners, such as the private sector, is needed. This, coupled with the reality that building low-carbon cities will require trillions of dollars’ worth of investments, means that collaboration with the private sector is essential.

Maia Kutner, head of cities at CDP, says: “Our report shows that cities do not need to go it alone when it comes to responding to climate change. They are recognizing there is power in numbers, which is why so many came together to form the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy this June. By partnering with the private sector, cities can not only spur the growth of new markets, they can deliver even greater emissions reductions. Tackling climate change is an enormous business opportunity. The time has come for cities to seize it.”

“This data supports what we are seeing in our direct dealings with cities. Cities the world over are identifying their priorities to reduce emissions, adapt to climate impacts and increase resilience, but more and more they are looking for partners to help them realise the solutions,” says Ben Smith, director of sustainable development, AECOM.

ENDS

Notes to editors:

The economic opportunities data reported by cities in 2016 is available to view on CDP’s open data portal.

For media information:

Kharunya Paramaguru // Communications manager // + 44 (0) 20 3818 3916 // Kharunya.paramaguru@cdp.net

Zoe Tcholak-Antitch // Communications // +1 646-270-3675 // Zoe.antitch@cdp.net

Carbon Disclosure Project, CDP, är ett samarbete mellan 827 institutionella investerare. CDP genomför världens största kartläggning av storföretagens ambitioner i klimat- och vattenfrågor, och att minska skövlingen av tropisk skog. Ett nordiskt sekretariat för CDP bildades år 2006 med säte i Stockholm. I år 2016 utfrågas över 250 nordiska företag om deras klimatpåverkan.

Emergence of the low-carbon economy presents significant economic opportunity for cities to collaborate with business, develop new industry sectors and build resilience. This years disclosures through CDP reveal that many cities are already actively looking to partner with the private sector on climate change - one great example is collaboration between the city of Stockholm and Ericsson.

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INVESTORS TURN THEIR GAZE TO WATER RISKS IN EUROPE

Pressmeddelanden   •   Maj 31, 2016 10:52 CEST

 31st May 2016: As competition for Europe’s precious supply of freshwater intensifies and the effects of climate change are increasingly felt, European companies still have some way to go to address water concerns according to global non-profit organization CDP. With the generous support of the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, the world leader in environmental reporting, CDP, today releases its first European water report “State of play in corporate water stewardship” providing a snapshot of the current state of play of corporate water action in Europe.

In a year when the World Economic Forum has ranked global water crises – including drought, increased risk of flooding and deteriorating water quality – as the greatest threat facing the planet over the next decade in terms of impact11, interest among institutional investors in water-related risk, opportunity and disclosure is growing. This year, through CDP, 643 institutional investors asked 299 of Europe’s largest publicly listed companies across industry sectors with high water vulnerability or impacts to disclose how they are adapting and responding to worsening water security - more than four times the number of investors backing the CDP request compared with the global program's first year in 2010.

While there are signs of action from this group, there is certainly room for improvement. 62% (186) of companies requested to report water data by investors, failed to do so. Only one European company, Metsä Board, made it to the CDP Water A list* which account for a total of eight companies worldwide (three in Japan, two in USA and two in South Africa).

Action is needed if these non-responding companies are to increase investor confidence that they are shoring up their business in the face of worsening water security.

According to Schroders, a global asset management company: 'Investor attitudes have changed over the last five years, as there is increasing recognition that there are environmental limits to economic growth. CDP data helps us analyse companies on the sector level comparing performance against their peers, understanding how companies are addressing risks, and also looking at opportunities.'

Energy and Industrial companies in particular are not meeting investor demands for transparency and action. Just 13% and 16% respectively, of the European's largest publicly listed companies in these sectors responded to CDP's annual request from investors to account for their water management strategies in 2015, less than the average disclosure rate of 38% this year.

This lack of transparency is concerning given over two-thirds of Energy companies (65%) and more than half of industrial companies globally (56%) say their business is vulnerable to substantive water risks. Furthermore, the bottom line has already been hit for a quarter (25% and 22%) of these companies due to water-related challenges in the past year – among the highest of the eight sectors reporting via CDP in 2015.

Despite concerns that European water policy goals may be unrealised due to poor water quality, eutrophication and the need for reforms in the way in which water is allocated for industrial, agriculture and energy production, more than half (56%) of companies are failing to conduct a comprehensive risk assessment – a basic first step for any company seeking to ensure business resilience against water issues.

Almost two thirds of respondents (61%) have identified water as a substantive business risk. A total 444 risks were reported by European companies, the majority of which are anticipated to impact either now or in the next three years.

Cate Lamb, head of water at CDP, says: "Just as oil was to the 20th century, water is fast becoming the defining resource of the 21st century. Unfortunately however, unlike oil, there is no replacement for water. Companies using CDP's water program are beginning to understand that taking a strategic view of how they manage water can enhance competitive advantage, investor appeal and business resilience. CDP's Water A List in particular understand that taking a more prudent approach to managing water will ultimately be of benefit to their business and wider stakeholders. It's now time to close the gap." The CDP Europe water report 2016 “State of play in corporate water stewardship” is available on the CDP website. 

Carbon Disclosure Project, CDP, är ett samarbete mellan 827 institutionella investerare. CDP genomför världens största kartläggning av storföretagens ambitioner i klimat- och vattenfrågor, och att minska skövlingen av tropisk skog. Ett nordiskt sekretariat för CDP bildades år 2006 med säte i Stockholm. I år 2016 utfrågas över 250 nordiska företag om deras klimatpåverkan.

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COMPANIES BLIND TO CLIMATE RISKS IN HALF THEIR SUPPLY CHAINS

Pressmeddelanden   •   Jan 26, 2016 07:17 CET

January 26, 2016: Following the historic international deal agreed at the UN climate conference, COP21, and the news from Davos that climate change is the world’s most impactful risk[1], major companies such as NH Hotel Group, Alcatel and Royal Philips are establishing the extent to which impending climate regulation will impact their business. However, half their key suppliers fail to respond to requests for climate information, hindering efforts to understand and manage climate risk. So finds the largest ever study of climate data from suppliers and their corporate customers, produced by CDPand written in partnership with BSR.

The COP21 Paris agreement requires global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to reduce to net zero well before the end of the century. With supply chains responsible for up to four times the GHGs of a company’s direct operations[2], they house sizable regulatory risk but also present ample opportunity for businesses to lower emissions.

For this reason, 75 multinationals representing over US$2 trillion in procurement spend work with CDP - providers of the global environmental disclosure platform - to seek data from 7,879 key suppliers on their carbon emissions and climate risk strategies. Information was received from 4,005 suppliers, meaning 49% failed to fulfill their customers’ requests, creating a substantial blind-spot for those preparing for a carbon constrained world.

Paul Simpson, chief executive officer of CDP says: “The science and the policy have never been clearer. Greenhouse gas emissions must decrease to net zero as early as possible in the second half of the century. Companies have a vital role to play in implementing the Paris agreement. Those that are unable to do so risk being the losers from this inevitable transition.”

Analysis of the suppliers that have disclosed demonstrates the scale of risk now facing companies: close to three quarters (72%) state that climate change presents risks that could significantly impact their business operations, revenue or expenditure. The majority (64%) of suppliers specifically identify climate regulation as a risk, with the most commonly cited consequences being fuel, energy and carbon taxes. Despite the high perception of climate related risk, less than half (45%) the participating suppliers have set a target to reduce their emissions and just one third (34%) have lowered their GHGs in the past reporting year.

Among the global regions Europe achieves leadership in a number of critical areas, notably the proportion of suppliers with emission reductions targets (54%) followed closely by China (51%). Europe also leads with the number of suppliers reporting emissions data (81%), ahead of the USA (73%) and the rest of the world, suggesting that European companies are best placed to become the suppliers of the low carbon future.

The majority (55%) of suppliers identified as the best climate performers with a position on the CDP Supplier A List hail from Europe, lead by Spain, followed by Germany and Switzerland.

Aron Cramer, president and CEO of BSR says: “As we work toward catalyzing business leadership for a climate-compatible world, BSR is proud to have partnered with CDP in developing this report. Collaboration between companies and their suppliers is crucial when it comes to understanding climate risks and opportunities and is key to building inclusive, resilient, and transparent global supply chains. We believe there is a great opportunity to be captured if the millions of suppliers not yet reporting follow the lead of those who are. Widening the circle of reporters will spread the message further, wider and deeper, with decisive action that aids business, climate, and public health.”

The new report - which includes commentary from McKinsey & Company - suggests that carbon emissions and climate management are increasingly factored into procurement decisions and are disrupting established supplier-based business models. L’Oréal, for example, works with CDP to create supplier climate scorecards that can be easily understood in the purchasing department. 

The Coca- Cola Company and LEGO Group are both experimenting with incentives and training for suppliers that will improve climate performance and generate shared value.

The climate performance of suppliers that disclose to CDP improves with time. Those that have participated in CDP’s supply chain program for at least the past three years demonstrate a more robust approach to climate management than those disclosing for the first time. For example, around three quarters of the 1,850 repeat participants have climate risk management procedures in place and are actively reducing emissions. Fewer than half the 1,258 first time disclosers can claim these advantages, clearly demonstrating that measurement and disclosure lead to better management.

Regular disclosers are also better at realizing financial benefits. Repeat participants achieve an average of US$1.5 million in annual savings for each carbon cutting project, compared to first time disclosers, who average annual savings of US$900,000 per initiative.

The report goes on to note various ways that purchasing organizations can improve the climate performance and risk management of suppliers. The solutions included are scalable, and CDP has seen US Federal Government participation in its program as national administrations look to set their own supply chains in order.

To enable multinationals to benchmark their performance and drive improvements, CDP will this year score companies on the management of carbon and climate change across their supply chains, with results to be published in the 2017 supply chain report.

Ends

About CDP Europe

CDP Europe, is part of the CDP worldwide network, an international, not-for-profit organization providing the only global system for companies and cities to measure, disclose, manage and share vital environmental information. CDP works with market forces, including 822 institutional investors with assets of over €86 trillion, to motivate companies to disclose their impacts on the environment and natural resources and take action to reduce them. More than 5,500 companies worldwide, of which nearly 1,800 in Europe, disclosed environmental information through CDP in 2015. CDP now holds the largest collection globally of primary climate change, water and forest risk commodities information and puts these insights at the heart of strategic business, investment and policy decisions. Please visit www.cdp.net/europe or follow us @CDP to find out more

About BSR

BSR is a global non-profit organization that works with its network of more than 250 member companies to build a just and sustainable world. From its offices in Asia, Europe, and North America, BSR develops sustainable business strategies and solutions through consulting, research, and cross-sector collaboration. Visit www.bsr.orgfor more information about BSR’s more than 20 years of leadership in sustainability.

BSR and CDP are founding partners of We Mean Business, a coalition of organizations working with thousands of the world’s most influential businesses and investors to achieve a low carbon economy.

For media information:

CDP Europe: Raffaella Colombo // Public Affairs and Communications Manager // +32 475 983421

BSR: Eva Dienel// BSR Communications // +1 510 684 9106

[1]The Global Risks Report, World Economic Forum, 2016.

[2]Committing to climate action in the supply chain, CDP, 2015.

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Risk för avmattning i företagens åtgärder för avskogningen

Pressmeddelanden   •   Dec 08, 2015 09:54 CET

8 december 2015: Sju av tio företag har åtaganden att ta itu med avskogning med få översätter dessa till meningsfulla åtgärder. Den internationell, icke-vinstdrivande organisation CDP har publicerat den Global Forest Report 2015 på uppdrag av 298 investerare med US$19 biljoner i tillgånger. CDP analyserar information från 171 av världens största företag för att fastställa hur de hanterar fyra viktiga varor som är kopplade till avskogningen: nörkreatur produkter, palmolja, trävaror och soja. 

Rapporten "Realizing zero-deforestation: Transforming supply chains for the future" lanserats under helgen på den Global Landscapes Forum i Paris. Resultaten tyder på att det finns en utbredd förståelse för de affärsmässiga argumenten för åtgärder, med nästan 90% av företagen som identifierar kommersiella möjligheter från att ta itu med avskogning. 

Utan relevanta strategier och upphandlingspolitik genomförs inte åtaganden tillräckligt snabbt. Hälften av företagen med åtaganden att köpa certifierad soja har ännu inte fått någon i sina leveranskedjor. Detta är också fallet för palmolja för över en fjärdedel (26%) av företagen. 

Den stora majoriteten av globala avskogningen är ansluten till jordbruket, och dessa fyra råvaror hamnar i utbredda produkter från choklad till biobränslen. Företag ser redan finansiella påverkan från produktionen av dessa varor, inklusive skador på varumärkets värde, högre driftskostnader från regulatoriska eller renommérisker. 

Tre nordiska företag har fått toppbetyg i CDPs Global Forest Report. Metsä Board, SCA och Tetra Pak har visat en avskogning riskhanteringsstrategi som är väl integrerat i hela sin verksamhet och har en detaljerad förståelse av avskogningsrisker och -effekter. 

Rapporten "Realizing zero-deforestation" och 2015 resultat från CDPs skogsprogram finns här

For media information:

CDP
Kharunya Paramaguru
Communications executive
+ 44 (0) 20 3818 3916
+ 44 (0) 7798 3613577
kharunya.paramaguru@cdp.net

Global Landscapes Forum
Susan Tonassi
Senior Associate, burness communications
+49 160 9327 9327
stonassi@burness.com

Om CDP Europe

CDP Europe är en del av CDPs globala nätverk, en internationell, icke-vinstdrivande organisation som tillhandahåller det globala systemet för företag och städer för att mäta, hantera och dela viktig miljöinformation. CDP arbetar med marknadskrafterna, bland annat 822 institutionella investerare med tillgångar över €86 biljoner, för att motivera företag att rapportera deras inverkan på miljön och naturresurserna och vidta åtgärder för att minska dem. Mer än 5.500 internationella företag, varav nästan 1.800 i Europa, delade miljöinformation genom CDP i 2015. CDP har väldens största databas över företagens egna beskrivning av hur verksamheten påverkas av klimatförändringar samt vatten- och avskogningsrelaterade risker och sätter dessa insikter i centrum för strategiska affärs, investeringar och politiska beslut. Besök www.cdp.net/europe eller följ oss @CDP för ta reda på mer. 

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Investor collaboration helps reduce corporate emissions by 641 million tonnes

Pressmeddelanden   •   Dec 03, 2015 14:20 CET

December 03, 2015: A new infographic released at the COP21 summit in Paris today, shows the impressive results that can be achieved when investors incentivize corporate action on carbon reductions. CDP’s Carbon Action initiative has this year helped reduce global corporate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 641 million tonnes of CO2e through emissions reduction projects such as improvements in energy efficiency, low-carbon energy purchase and installation, process emissions reductions and improved transportation use.

Carbon Action brings together an influential group of 304 investors now with US$22 trillion in assets - up from US$6.7 trillion and 35 investors at launch in 2011. The group asks companies to help tackle climate change in three ways: i) make emissions reductions; ii) publicly disclose emissions reduction targets; and iii) invest in emissions reduction projects with a positive return.

Carbon Action assesses companies in energy intensive sectors including oil & gas, electric utilities, materials, mining & metals, transportation and consumer staples.

Results include:

  • An increase in reported emissions reductions, amounting to 641 million fewer tonnes of CO2e in the atmosphere. This is equivalent to closing down over 168 coal-fired power plants[1]. The number of responding companies increased by 145% to 552, a sixfold increase since 2011 launch.
  •  2457 emissions reduction projects reported, with US$86 billion invested to these projects.
  • 23% of companies in CDP’s Carbon Action samplehad no emissions-reduction targets in 2015, which continues to be cause for concern.

Helen Wildsmith, Strategic Advisor, CDP Investor Initiatives said:

"In the run up to the climate negotiations in Paris a record number of companies were contacted by CDP's investor-led Carbon Action initiative. This year these companies reported 641 million tonnes of cost-effective emission reductions in response to 304 investors with over $22 trillion of assets. Throughout 2016 we'll be re-grouping to: capitalize on the CDP data cleaning announced today; globalize the Carbon Catalyst Group that oversees the initiative from amongst CDP's growing membership; and align the 2017 Carbon Action requests with CDP's new sector research notes. The period through to 2020 is critical for climate change, and this action-oriented initiative's second five years will help drive more strategic change across over 1300 major companies in high impact sectors."

CDP is facilitating analysis around the exposure of companies and investor portfolios to carbon risk through strengthening the accuracy and completeness of the GHG emissions data available to investors. In collaboration with Enviance Inc. and two professors from Carnegie Mellon University, CDP has today launched a new methodology and supporting models to assess the accuracy of self-reported corporate emissions data and estimate Scopes 1, 2 and 3 emissions for companies that do not disclose them. This will help inform discussions on areas such as carbon footprinting and give investors access to high quality emissions data for use in portfolio analysis. The inclusion of Scope 3 emissions signals investors’ changing perception of corporate GHG emissions from purely operational to value chain based.

The methodology has been applied to the Carbon Action sample and covers 6 years of Scope 1 and Scope 2 data, since 2009, as well as relevant up-/downstream Scope 3 Categories from the most recent reporting period. The full set of clean and complete data is available free for CDP’s investor signatories on the CDP Portal. A subset of the historical data is available to everyone on CDP’s Open Data Platform.

[1] Data from to United States Environmental Agency Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies Calculator: http://www2.epa.gov/energy/greenhouse-gas-equivalencies-calculator

### ENDS ###

Notes to editor

For more information or for exclusive interviews with the CDP team, please contact:

About CDP


CDP, formerly Carbon Disclosure Project, is an international, not-for-profit organization providing the only global system for companies and cities to measure, disclose, manage and share vital environmental information. CDP works with market forces, including 822 institutional investors with assets of US$95 trillion, to motivate companies to disclose their impacts on the environment and natural resources and take action to reduce them. More than 5,500 companies disclosed environmental information through CDP in 2015. CDP now holds the largest collection globally of primary climate change, water and forest risk commodities information and puts these insights at the heart of strategic business, investment and policy decisions. Please visit www.cdp.net or follow us @CDP to find out more.

- US$22 trillion investor group engaging with over 1,300 companies led by CDP; - Total reduction of 641 million tonnes of CO2e – equivalent to closing down over 168 coal-fired power plants; - New open-source methodology aims to establish ‘common language’ for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions estimates

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  • Presskontakt
  • Communications manager
  • Communications
  • catherine.vonaltheer@cdp.net
  • +44 (0) 7794 003 903
  • +44 (0) 20 7970 5682

Om CDP (tidigare Carbon Disclosure Project)

CDP vill påverka hur vi gör affärer för att förhindra farliga klimatförändringar och skydda våra naturresurser.

CDP, tidigare känt som Carbon Disclosure Project, är ett samarbete mellan 827 institutionella investerare. CDP genomför världens största kartläggning av storföretagens ambitioner i klimat- och vattenfrågor, och att minska skövlingen av tropisk skog. Ett nordiskt sekretariat för CDP bildades år 2006 med säte i Stockholm. I år 2017 utfrågas över 250 nordiska företag om deras klimatpåverkan.