Textilimportörerna

Ftalater i kläder på Naturskyddsföreningens presskonferens

Pressmeddelande   •   Sep 18, 2008 08:45 CEST

Ftalater i kläder på Naturskyddsföreningens presskonferens i morgon 18/9

(kan komma att föregås av debattartikel i någon av de stora morgontidningarna)

Naturskyddsföreningen kommer att hålla en presskonferens som inledning till den aktivitetsvecka som organisationen traditionsenligt genomför på hösten varje år. Enligt uppgifter som vi fått kommer presskonferensen att handla om ftalater i kläder.

Textilimportörerna vill därför informera om att vi redan 2003 rekommenderade våra medlemsföretag, och även andra företag i branschen, att i avvaktan på då pågående riskbedömningar av ftalater använda ftalaterna DINP och DIDP i stället för ftalaterna DEHP, DBP och BBP.

Resultatet vid en test ska visa att DEHP, DBP och BBP inte finns i den testade varan.

För uttömmande information om ftalater och andra mjukgörare i plaster hänvisar vi till www.ecpi.org .

Det finns nu riskbedömningar för dessa ftalater. Dessa visar att det inte finns några hälso- eller miljörisker med ftalaterna DINP och DIDP, och att de är små eller ringa för övriga. För fakta om dessa ftalater - se nedan.

För ev frågor hänvisas till vår konsult Åke Weyler, tel: 08-36 04 91, 070-559 10 77.

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DINP

The European Commission has confirmed that Di-isononyl phthalate (DINP) poses no risk to either human health or the environment from any current use.

The European Commission's findings (published in the EU Official Journal on April 13 2006) confirm the outcome of a risk assessment involving more than 10 years of extensive scientific evaluation by EU regulators. (www.ecpi.org)

DIDP

The European Commission has confirmed that Diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP) poses no risk to either human health or the environment from any current use.

The European Commission published its findings in the EU Official Journal on April 13 2006, confirming the outcome of a risk assessment involving more than 10 years of extensive scientific evaluation by EU regulators (www.ecpi.org)

DEHP

The European Union has confirmed that DEHP poses no general risk to human health. The summary of a comprehensive European risk assessment, involving nearly 15 years of extensive scientific evaluation by EU regulators, was published in the EU Official Journal on February 7 2008.

The assessment demonstrates that DEHP poses no risk to the general population and that no further measures need to be taken to manage the substance in any of its key end-use applications. This confirms an earlier opinion of member state experts and an opinion from the EU Scientific Committee for Toxicity, Ecotoxicity and the Environment (CSTEE) adopted in 2004.

The only areas of possible risk identified in the assessment relate to:

The use of DEHP in children's toys: Under regulations introduced in January 2007 DEHP is no longer permitted in toys and childcare articles in the EU.

Possible exposure of workers in factories: But adequate precautions are already taken based on occupational exposure limit values.

Some localised environmental exposure near to factories: The European Union will finalise measures relating to emissions controls from converters plants during 2008.

The use of DEHP in certain medical devices: An EU Scientific Review is being undertaken to determine whether there may be any risk from the use of DEHP in certain medical applications (children and neonates undergoing long-term blood transfusion and adults undergoing long-term haemodialysis). However, in October 2002 the European Union's Scientific Committee on Medicinal Products and Medical Devices published an Opinion on the use of DEHP at that saying that it could make no recommendations to limit its use.

Possible environmental risk to river basins: to be addressed through the use of Environmental Quality Standards (which already exist for DEHP). (www.ecpi.org)

DBP

An EU Risk Assessment has been conducted on DBP and the final outcome has now been published in the EU Official Journal. To eliminate a potential risk to plants in the vicinity of processing sites and possibly to workers through inhalation measures are to be taken within the framework of the IPPC Directive (96/61/EC) and the Occupational Exposure Directive (98/24/EC).

However, following the recent adoption of EU legislation with regard to the marketing and use of phthalates in toys and childcare articles, the risk assessment conclusionsclearly state there is no need for any further measures to regulate the use of DBP in finished products.

An EU Risk Assessment has been conducted on DBP and the final outcome has now been published in the EU Official Journal. To eliminate a potential risk to plants in the vicinity of processing sites and possibly to workers through inhalation measures are to be taken within the framework of the IPPC Directive (96/61/EC) and the Occupational Exposure Directive (98/24/EC).

However, following the recent adoption of EU legislation with regard to the marketing and use of phthalates in toys and childcare articles, the risk assessment conclusionsclearly state there is no need for any further measures to regulate the use of DBP in finished products. (www.ecpi.org)

BBP

The phthalates BBP and DINP are essential ingredients in the production of vinyl flooring. A product that is widely used for both aesthetic and hygiene reasons - it is easy to keep clean and does not harbour dust mites that cause asthma.

BBP cannot be considered highly toxic. At high doses it causes adverse effects in rodents but these dose levels are many orders of magnitude higher than the level of exposure to children or adults from its use in flooring.

It has been erroneously claimed that BBP causes reproductive anomalies in male rodent offspring when mother exposed to levels of BBP similar to human exposure. This study by Sharpe et al (1995) has been repeated by three independent labs and none have been able to find any adverse effects. Sharpe et al (1998) have subsequently commented on their study and now believe that the changes they saw were due to biological variability rather than the dosing of BBP.

The level of BBP in indoor air, either free or adsorbed to dust particles is very low. In the ongoing EU risk assessment of BBP, even taking a worst-case estimate of BBP intake for small children, it has been concluded that this exposure presents no significant risk. (www.ecpi.org)

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