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Newspaper Future is Bright: WAN President

Pressmeddelanden   •   Jun 04, 2008 08:58 CEST

Newspapers are well-placed to succeed in the modern media environment, and forecasters who predict the industry's decline are making a "profound mistake", the President of the World Association of Newspapers said today (Tuesday), making the case for a vibrant future for the newspaper industry.

"Virtually every brokerage report from the investment banks appears to support a new conventional wisdom that newspapers are soon to be some relic of the past, and that newspaper companies are not up for the challenge - or indeed, the many opportunities - that the digital world offers. What a profound mistake these commentators are making," said WAN President Gavin O'Reilly, speaking during the World Newspaper Congress in Göteborg, Sweden.

"All of us in the industry know the big strategic issues and challenges at play in the fast evolving digital world - and, the really successful publishers are those who recognise and capitalise on the newspaper's relative position in the busy media matrix. Happily, that is the majority of publishers today," he said.

"The fact is that newspapers are winning well in a world of heightened digital fragmentation," he said. "In properly assessing the performance of newspapers, one needs to calmly analyze the underlying audience trends for our industry - the quantum of our readership and the quality demographic that we deliver, coupled with the incremental and growing audience that we garner from online - and the conclusion is that our industry is extremely well-positioned at weathering the storm that is media fragmentation, guaranteeing as we do sizeable, reliable and relatively stable audiences. "

Newspapers are a US$190 billion dollar industry globally, reaching 1.7 billion readers daily, said Mr O'Reilly during a Congress session dedicated to Shaping the Future of the Newspaper.

The industry is expected to grow its advertising by 17% over the next 5 years, or at a faster rate than the preceding 5 years, said Mr O'Reilly, the Group Chief Operating Officer of Independent News & Media plc.

"Newspapers are a vibrant, relevant and commercial proposition for readers and advertisers alike. For investors, the investment in new technology and the delivery of new audiences produces an unrivalled cocktail of success: strong, definable demographics coupled with strong margins delivering consistent returns."

The Congress, along with the World Editors Forum and Info Services Expo 2008, has drawn 1,800 newspaper publishers, editors and other senior executives to Göteborg, Sweden. The conferences continue through Wednesday.

WAN is a leading provider of industry research and analysis through its Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project, which identifies, analyses and publicises all important breakthroughs and opportunities that can benefit newspapers all over the world. SFN provides WAN members with Strategy Reports on these developments, a library of case studies and business ideas, and a wealth of other vital information for all those who need to follow press industry trends. More on the project can be found at http://www.futureofthenewspaper.com.

WAN conducts the SFN project with support from four international partners -- PubliGroupe, the Swiss-based international advertising and promotion group; manroland, a leading company for newspaper production systems; Telenor, the leading Norwegian telecommunications, IT and media group; and Atex, the leading supplier of solutions and services for advertising, content management, circulation and online applications.

Inquiries to: Larry Kilman, Director of Communications, WAN, 7 rue Geoffroy St Hilaire, 75005 Paris France. Tel: +33 1 47 42 85 00. Fax: +33 1 47 42 49 48. Mobile: +33 6 10 28 97 36. E-mail: lkilman@wan.asso.fr

Newspapers are well-placed to succeed in the modern media environment, and forecasters who predict the industry's decline are making a "profound mistake", the President of the World Association of Newspapers said today (Tuesday), making the case for a vibrant future for the newspaper industry.

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Just Published: World Digital Media Trends

Pressmeddelanden   •   Jun 04, 2008 08:54 CEST

The digital platforms of newspaper companies are growing at double-digit rates world-wide, both in usage and revenue production, according to the World Digital Media Trends report unveiled at the World Newspaper Congress by the World Association of Newspapers.

The second annual report, which examines digital media advertising and usage trends and their impact on newspaper companies, showed:

- Digital and mobile advertising revenues are projected to grow to more than 150 billion dollars by 2011, a 12-fold growth from 2002.

- Wireless subscriptions continue to grow, from 1.1 billion in 2002 to a projected 3.4 billion in 2011, an expansion of more than three-fold.

- Broadband is expected to grow from 51.38 million households world-wide in 2002 to nearly 540 million households in 2011, a growth of more than ten-fold.

- The mobile customer base has grown from 945 million in 2001 to 2.6 billion in 2006.

The report includes studies from 71 research partners about digital usage and revenue patterns, and provides a map of "digital hot spots" where mobile and internet delivery are developing particularly rapidly. It also includes case studies of newspaper companies whose digital strategies are increasing revenue and audiences.

Full details of World Digital Media Trends, including excerpts, can be found at http://www.wan-press.org/worlddigitalmediatrends

World Digital Media Trends is published by the WAN Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project, which identifies, analyses and publicises all important breakthroughs and opportunities that can benefit newspapers all over the world. More on the SFN project can be found at http://www.futureofthenewspaper.com

The report was unveiled at the World Newspaper Conference, during a review of the SFN's 2007-2008 research reports. Other reports in the 2007-2008 series include: Envisioning the Newspaper 2020, Engaging Young Readers, Investing in Newspapers, The Value of News Content, Scenario Planning for Newspaper Companies, and Benchmarking New Digital Revenues.

All SFN reports, with the exception of World Digital Media Trends, are available exclusively to WAN members. More on the benefits of WAN membership can be found at http://www.wan-press.org/membership

WAN conducts the SFN project with support from five international partners -- PubliGroupe, the Swiss-based international advertising and promotion group; MAN Roland, a leading company for newspaper production systems; UPM-Kymmene, one of the world's leading printing paper producers; Telenor, the leading Norwegian telecommunications, IT and media group; and Atex, the leading supplier of solutions and services for advertising, content management, circulation and online applications.

The Paris-based WAN, the global organisation for the newspaper industry, defends and promotes press freedom and the professional and business interests of newspapers world-wide. Representing 18,000 newspapers, its membership includes 77 national newspaper associations, newspaper companies and individual newspaper executives in 102 countries, 12 news agencies and 11 regional and world-wide press groups.

Inquiries to: Larry Kilman, Director of Communications, WAN, 7 rue Geoffroy St Hilaire, 75005 Paris France. Tel: +33 1 47 42 85 00. Fax: +33 1 47 42 49 48. Mobile: +33 6 10 28 97 36. E-mail: lkilman@wan.asso.fr

The digital platforms of newspaper companies are growing at double-digit rates world-wide, both in usage and revenue production, according to the World Digital Media Trends report unveiled at the World Newspaper Congress by the World Association of Newspapers.

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World’s Press Criticises UN Human Rights Council

Pressmeddelanden   •   Jun 04, 2008 08:51 CEST

The World Association of Newspapers and World Editors Forum has condemned the UN Human Rights Council's repeated efforts to undermine freedom of expression in the name of protecting religious sensibilities.

"WAN reminds the UN that the Council's proper role is to defend freedom of expression and not to support the censorship of opinion at the request of autocracies," the WAN Board said in a resolution issued during the World Newspaper Congress and World Editors Forum, the global meetings of the world's press being held in Göteborg, Sweden.

WAN and WEF issued six other resolution to:

- Condemn widespread press freedom violations during the recent presidential elections in Zimbabwe (read the full resolution at http://www.wan-press.org/article17295.html );

- Invite newly-elected Russian President Dmitry Medvedev to "decisively support and promote freedom of the press in Russia (read the full resolution at http://www.wan-press.org/article17287.html );

- Appeal to African leaders to abolish libel and criminal defamation laws and to promote and implement the highest standards of press freedom at outlined in the Table Mountain Declaration (read the full resolution at http://www.wan-press.org/article17291.html);

- Call on Chinese authorities to release all imprisoned journalists and cyber-reporters ahead of the upcoming Olympic Games and to honour the press freedom commitments it made in its successful Olympic bid (read the full resolution at http://www.wan-press.org/article17283.html );

- Condemn the continued imprisonment of fourteen journalists in Eritrea and call for their release (read the full resolution at http://www.wan-press.org/article17285.html );

- And to express deep concern over the growing tendency of sports organisations to restrict press coverage of their events, both in print and digitally (read the full resolution at http://www.wan-press.org/article17289.html ).

In the resolution condemning actions by the UN Human Rights Council, WAN cited the Council's approval of an amendment proposed by the Organisation of the Islamic Conference requiring the Council's investigator to "report on instances where the abuse of the right to freedom of exprssion constitutes an act of racial or religious discrimination."

WAN said the amendment "goes against the spirit" of the work of the Spcial Rapporteur and would require him to investigate abusive expression "rather than focusing on the endemic problem of abusive limits on expression imposed by governments, including many of those on the Council."

"The WAN Board is concerned at what appeears to be the emergence of a negative trend against freedom of expression in the UN Human Rights Council," the resolution said. "In March 2007, the Council has already passed a resolution, sponsored by Pakistan on behalf of the Organisastion of the Islamic Conference, which opened the door to the restrictions of freedom of expression by governments on the grounds that it might offend religious sensibilities."

The United Nations Human Rights Council, whose stated purpose is to address human rights violations, is the successor to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, which was often criticised for the high-profile positions it gave to member states that did not guarantee the human rights of their own citizens. International human rights groups have expressed concerned that the Council may be emulating the practices that discredited the Commission on Human Rights.

The WAN resolution called on the Council President and UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon "to protect the mandate of the Special Rapporteur and to ensure that international standards of freedom of expression and fully supported by the UN Human Rights Council and not undermined by it." The resolution can be read at http://www.wan-press.org/article17293.html

The Paris-based WAN, the global organisation for the newspaper industry, defends and promotes press freedom and the professional and business interests of newspapers world-wide. Representing 18,000 newspapers, its membership includes 77 national newspaper associations, newspaper companies and individual newspaper executives in 102 countries, 12 news agencies and 11 regional and world-wide press groups.

Inquiries to: Larry Kilman, Director of Communications, WAN, 7 rue Geoffroy St Hilaire, 75005 Paris France. Tel: +33 1 47 42 85 00. Fax: +33 1 47 42 49 48. Mobile: +33 6 10 28 97 36. E-mail: lkilman@wan.asso.fr

The World Association of Newspapers and World Editors Forum has condemned the UN Human Rights Council's repeated efforts to undermine freedom of expression in the name of protecting religious sensibilities.

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World Press Trends: Newspapers Are A Growth Business

Pressmeddelanden   •   Jun 03, 2008 08:58 CEST

Newspaper circulations world-wide rose 2.57 percent in 2007 while rapid growth of both free titles and on-line platforms is expanding the reach of newspapers everywhere, the World Association of Newspapers announced today (Monday).

WAN said global newspaper sales were up +2.57 percent over the year, and had increased +9.39 percent over the past five years.

When free dailies are added to the paid newspaper circulation, global circulation increased +3.65 percent last year, and +14.3 percent over the past five years. Free dailies now account for nearly 7 percent of all global newspaper circulation and for 23 percent of circulation in Europe alone.

Advertising revenues in paid dailies were up +0.86 percent last year from a year earlier, and up +12.84 percent over five years, WAN said. Print remains the world's largest advertising medium, with a 40 percent share.

"Newspaper circulation has been rising or stable in three-quarters of the world's countries over the past five years and in nearly 80 percent of countries in the past year," said Timothy Balding, Chief Executive Officer of the World Association of Newspapers.

"And even in places where paid-for circulation is declining, notably the United States and some countries in western Europe, newspapers continue to extend their reach through a wide variety of free and niche publications and through their rapidly developing multi-media platforms," he said.

The new data, from WAN's annual survey of world press trends, was released to more than 1,800 publishers, editors and other senior newspaper executives from 113 countries attending the 61st World Newspaper Congress and 15th World Editors Forum in Göteborg, Sweden - a record attendance for the global meetings of the world's press.

The figures showed:

- Paid daily circulation grew +2.57 percent worldwide in 2007 from a year earlier, taking global sales to a new high of more than 532 million daily. With free dailies added, daily circulation increases to more than 573 million, a +3.65 percent increase from the total of paid and free dailies in 2006.

- The total number of paid-for daily titles was up +2.98 percent in the world in 2007 and up 11.02 percent since 2003 to a record 11,926 titles. The total number of paid and free titles increased by +3.65 percent in 2007 and by +14.30 percent since 2003.

- Newspaper advertising revenue increased +0.86 percent in 2007 from a year earlier, and was up +9.39 percent over five years.

The survey, which WAN has published annually since 1986, includes information on all countries and territories where newspapers are published -- 232.

The 2008 World Press Trends report reveals:

On circulation

- Paid daily newspaper circulations were up or stable in nearly 80 percent of countries where figures were available in 2007. Over the past five years, they were up or stable in 75 percent
of the countries.

- More than 532 million people buy a newspaper every day, up from 486 million in 2003.
Average readership is estimated to be more than 1.7 billion people each day.

- 74 of the world's 100 best selling dailies are published in Asia. China, Japan and India account for 62 of them.

-The five largest markets for newspapers are: China, with 107 million copies sold daily; India, with 99 million copies daily; Japan, with 68 million copies daily; the United States, with nearly 51 million; and Germany, 20.6 million.

- Circulation sales were up +6.72 percent in South America in 2007 over the previous year, up +4.7 percent in Asia, down -0.49 percent in Africa, down -1.87 percent in Europe, down -2.14 percent in North America and down -4.28 percent in Australia and Oceania.

- The number of paid-for newspaper titles increased everywhere except North America, where they were down -0.56 percent. The number of newspaper titles was up +5.3 percent in Asia, +4.55 percent in Australia and Oceania, +3.99 percent in Africa , +2.54 percent in South America, and +0.48 percent in Europe.

- In the European Union, paid daily newspapers saw a -2.37 percent drop in 2007 and a -5.91 percent drop since 2003. Combined with free dailies, circulation in the EU rose +2 percent over one year and +9.61 percent over five years.

Newspapers in 11 European Union countries increased their total paid circulation in 2007. They were: Austria +2.12 percent, Bulgaria +7.20 percent, Cyprus +2 percent, Czech Republic +0.18 percent, Estonia +1.09 percent, Greece +1.91 percent, Lithuania +3.55 percent, Malta +2, Portugal +1.49, Romania +3.04, and Spain +0.29. Circulation was stable in Luxembourg.

Those reporting losses were: Belgium -0.49 percent, Denmark -2.13 percent, Finland -0.99 percent, France -0.48 percent, Germany -2.38 percent, Hungary -8.27 percent, Ireland -0.38 percent, Italy -0.29 percent, Latvia -26.48 percent, the Netherlands -2.92 percent, Poland -11.57 percent, Slovakia -5.25 percent, Slovenia -6.29 percent, Sweden -3.49 percent, and the United Kingdom -3.46 percent.

Over the five years 2003-2007, paid circulation rose in 12 countries: Austria +13.17, Bulgaria +4.95, Cyprus +13.33, Czech Republic +0.30, Estonia +11.16, Ireland +3.24, Lithuania +15.42 percent, Malta +20 percent, Portugal +6.67 percent, Romania +19.40 percent, Slovakia +1 percent, and Slovenia +9.33 percent.

In the same period, circulation declined in: Belgium -4.13 percent, Denmark -10.14 percent, Finland -1.83 percent, France -4.83 percent, Germany -8.78 percent, Greece -0.62 percent, Hungary -13.57 percent, Italy -3.80 percent, Latvia -34.08 percent, Luxembourg -0.87 percent, the Netherlands -11.54 percent, Poland -3.88 percent, Spain -0.84 percent, Sweden -6.49 percent, and the United Kingdom -10.14 percent.

Elsewhere in Europe, circulation in 2007 increased in Albania, +7.14 percent, Moldova +21.20 percent, Montenegro +9.09 percent, and Ukraine +5.60 percent. It decreased in Croatia -6.25 percent, Iceland -4.76 percent, Macedonia -3.57 percent, Norway -2.11 percent, and Switzerland -2.94 percent.

Over five years, circulation increased in Moldova +278.75 percent, Montenegro +33.33 percent, and Ukraine +481 percent. It declined in Albania -1.32 percent, Iceland -43.66 percent, Macedonia -10 percent, Norway -9.31 percent, and Switzerland -12.26 percent.

- The number of paid-for newspaper titles in the EU climbed +0.41 percent in 2007, to 1,484, and was up +3.49 percent over five years. When paid and free titles are combined, the number of titles rose +0.69 percent over one year and +8.53 percent over five years.

- The circulation of US dailies fell -3.03 percent in 2007 and -8.05 percent over five years. Most of the decline came in evening dailies, which saw a year-on-year circulation decline of -10.08 percent, compared with only -1.97 percent for morning dailies. Over the past five years, evening dailies declined -25 percent, compared with a -5.08 percent drop for morning newspapers.

- In Japan, newspaper sales fell by -0.96 percent in 2007. Over five years, sales are down -2.70 percent.

- China newspaper sales continue to perform well, up +3.84 and +20.69 percent over one and five years.

-In Latin America, circulation increased in 2007 in Argentina +7.54 percent, Brazil +11.80 percent, Chile +3.99 percent, and Suriname +3.77 percent. Circulation was stable in Bolivia, Ecuador, Guyana, Uruguay and Venezuela. Newspaper sales fell in Colombia -1.25 percent and Paraguay -3.85 percent.

Over five years, circulations increased in Argentina +22.70 percent, Bolivia +3.70 percent, Brazil +24.93 percent, Chile +13.82 percent, Colombia +8.97 percent, Ecuador +15.22 percent, Guyana +6.67 percent, and Suriname +22.22 percent. Circulations declined in Paraguay -16.67 percent and Uruguay -11.18 percent.

- Indian newspaper sales increased 11.22 percent in 2007 and 35.51 percent in the five-year period.

- Elsewhere in Asia, sales were up in Bangladesh +7.69, Hong Kong +2.50 percent, Indonesia +2 percent, Kazakhstan +12.5 percent, Kyrgyzstan +18.18 percent, Macau +2.70 percent, Malaysia +61.83 percent, Mongolia +3.85 percent, Nepal +4.62 percent, Pakistan +0.50 percent, Singapore +16 percent, Vietnam 0.71. Circulation decreased in Korea -1.03 percent, the Philippines -0.53 percent and Taiwan -4.76 percent. It was stable in Cambodia and Thailand.

- Over five years, circulation increased in Bangladesh +40 percent, Cambodia +10 percent, Indonesia +11.67 percent, Kazakhstan +181 percent, Macau +12.43 percent, Malaysia +93.95 percent, Mongolia +42.11 percent, Nepal +36 percent, Pakistan +32 percent, Singapore +16.44 percent, Thailand +9.77 percent, Turkmenistan +24.44 percent, and Vietnam +6.42 percent. It decreased in Hong Kong -8.89 percent, Korea -2.69 percent, and Taiwan -11.11 percent.

In the Middle East, where it has been difficult to obtain reliable data, circulation increased in 2007 in Bahrain +3.33 percent, Iran +3.61 percent, Jordan +12.50 percent, Kuwait +27.91 percent, Oman +17 percent, Palestinian Authority +12.50 percent and Saudi Arabia +0.21 percent. It was stable in Israel, Lebanon and Syria.

- Sales in Australia recorded an decrease of -5.35 percent in 2007. while New Zealand newspaper sales were down -1.39 percent year-on-year.

-In Africa, sales were up in 2007 in Algeria +4.17 percent, Benin +4.17 percent, Cameroon +4.29 percent, The Gambia +33.33 percent, Ivory Coast +2.56 percent, Kenya +45.45 percent, Liberia +10 percent, Libya +42.86 percent, Madagascar 4.76 percent, Morocco 10 percent, Namibia +10 percent, Senegal +2.50 percent, Somalia +5 percent, and South Africa 2.70 percent.

Sales declined in 2007 in Burkina Faso -3.03, Nigeria -37.80, Reunion -1.37, -8 percent in Zimbabwe.

- The Japanese remain the world's greatest newspaper buyers, with 624 daily sales per thousand adults. They are followed by Norway with 580 sales per thousand, Finland with 503 and Sweden and Singapore with 449.

- The Turks spend the most time with their newspapers -- 74 minutes a day -- followed by the Belgians with 54, and the Finns and Chinese, with 48 minutes each, on average.

On advertising

- Global newspaper advertising revenues have increased for five straight years and were up +0.86 percent in 2007. It has increased 12.84 percent over the five-year period.

- Newspapers share of the world ad market in 2007 fell slightly to 27.5 percent from 28.7 percent a year in 2006. Newspapers remain the world's second largest advertising medium, after television, with more revenue than radio, cinema, outdoor, and the internet combined. When newspapers and magazines are combined, print is the world's largest advertising medium, with a 40 percent share, compared to 38 percent for television.

Newspaper advertising revenues - excluding frees, where consistent data is not yet available - increased in all regions except North America, where it fell -2.77 percent in 2007. Revenues increased in western Europe +2 percent, Asia-Pacific +3.31 percent, Middle East and Africa +13.17 percent, Latin America +10.77 percent and central & eastern Europe +5.39 percent.

Between 2003 and 2007, newspaper advertising revenues increased in all regions: North America, +8.1 percent, western Europe +10.15 percent, Asia Pacific 13.88 percent, Middle East and Africa 99.3 percent, Latin America, 55.38 percent, and central and eastern Europe +8.47 percent.

- Newspaper advertising revenues in the USA, by far the largest newspaper advertising market in the world, decreased by -3 percent in 2007 but increased by +8 percent over the last five years.

- In Japan, ad expenditures declined in 2007 by -4.08 percent and were down -8.77 percent over the past five years.

- China saw an increase in advertising revenues of +16.13 percent last year, and +49.39percent over five years.

- Newspaper markets in the European Union saw a +1.51 percent increase in newspaper advertising revenues in 2007, and a +9.91 percent increase over five years.

19 of 24 EU countries for which data was available showed increases in advertising revenue in 2007: Austria +9.07 percent, Belgium +2.36 percent, Denmark +0.67 percent, Estonia +15.78 percent, Finland +5.46 percent, Germany +0.84 percent, Greece +12.73 percent, Ireland +9.04 percent, Italy +1.1 percent, Latvia +6.20 percent, Lithuania +8.18 percent, the Netherlands +2 percent, Poland +2.5 percent, Portugal +1.49 percent, Romania + 20.37 percent, Slovakia +8 percent, Slovenia +1.77 percent, Spain +6 percent, and Sweden +4.5 percent,

Newspaper advertising revenue declined in Bulgaria (-4.66), Czech Republic (-7.04), Hungary (-0.05 percent), and the United Kingdom (-1.79 percent).

Over five years, advertising revenues was up in all but three of the 25 countries for which data was available: Austria +34.92 percent, Belgium +89.97 percent, Bulgaria +30.71 percent, the Czech Republic +27.54 percent, Denmark +27.44 percent, Estonia +67.91 percent, Finland +5.46 percent, France +2.19 percent, Germany +5.7 percent, Greece +78.57 percent, Hungary +19.7 percent, Ireland +58.85 percent, Italy +7.56 percent, Latvia +44.6 percent, Lithuania +33.48 percent, Netherlands +0.63 percent, Romania +106.82 percent, Slovakia +43.09 percent, Spain +26.87 percent, and Sweden +18.95 percent. Advertising revenues declined over five years in Poland -58.58, Portugal -1.63 and in the United Kingdom -5.18 percent.

- In India, newspaper advertising revenues decline -1.42 percent in 2007 but were up 64.8 percent over five years.

- Internet advertising revenues - not just newspapers online, but all internet advertising - was up 32.45 percent over one year and 200 percent over five years. Most of the revenue is generated in the United States, western Europe and in the Asia-Pacific region: North American internet advertising revenue is 20 times greater than the combined revenue generated in central and eastern Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and Africa.

Even within the regions themselves, the distribution of internet advertising revenue is striking. The United Kingdom has nearly 40 percent of all internet advertising revenues generated in Europe, while Germany has 23 percent and France has 14 percent. If the US and European markets are combined, the US would have a 62 percent share, followed by the United Kingdom with 15 percent and Germany with 8 percent.

In Europe, internet display advertising revenues now surpass classified revenues while search remains the largest advertising market online.

Newspaper online revenues are forecast to more than double in the next five years and will account for 12 percent of total newspaper advertising by 2011.

Free Dailies

- A total of 312 free daily newspapers had a combined circulation of 41.04 million daily, a circulation increase of 20 percent over one year and 173.2 percent over five years.

- When free and paid-for circulations are combined, free dailies account for 7 percent of the total world-wide, 23 percent in Europe, 8 percent in the US and 2 percent in Asia.


- The six largest free dailies are Leggo in Italy (1.95 million copies), Metro in the United Kingdom (1.37 million copies), 20 Minutos in Spain (1 million copies), Metro in Canada (990,000 copies), and Que! and ADN in Spain (959,000 copies each).

Newspapers On-line

- The number of newspaper on-line sites grew +13.77 percent in 2007 and +50.77 percent over the five years from 2003.

- A study in the US shows that newspaper web site users also read the print edition: 81 percent of online newspaper readers also read a printed newspaper at least once a week. Half say they spend the same time as they did previously with newspaper content, while 35 percent they spend more time overall with newspaper content.

- Also in the US, newspaper audiences grew 8 percent through a combination of print and online in 2007.

-The World Press Trends 2008 edition is now available by contacting the World Association of Newspapers, 7 rue Geoffroy Saint Hilaire, 75005 Paris France. Tel: +33 1 47 42 85 00, Fax +33 1 47 42 49 48. E-mail: contact_us@wan.asso.fr.

In addition to much more data, country by country, the 930-page publication includes information on:

Non-daily publications, which in some markets are performing better than dailies;

Advertising expenditure forecasts for newspapers and magazines, together with total spending forecasts, for 2008, 2009 and 2010;

Trends in format and cover price of daily newspapers; in colour capability; in media consumption, in display and classified advertising income, in distribution of sales between single copy and subscription;

Data on the top-selling titles in each country, the top sectors for advertising in newspapers and the major advertisers;

Information on the tax rates and conditions for the press, on subsidies, on ownership regulations, and more.

The Paris-based WAN, the global organisation for the newspaper industry, defends and promotes press freedom and the professional and business interests of newspapers world-wide. Representing 18,000 newspapers, its membership includes 77 national newspaper associations, newspaper companies and individual newspaper executives in 102 countries, 12 news agencies and 11 regional and world-wide press groups.

Inquiries to: Larry Kilman, Director of Communications, WAN, 7 rue Geoffroy St Hilaire, 75005 Paris France. Tel: +33 1 47 42 85 00. Fax: +33 1 47 42 49 48. Mobile: +33 6 10 28 97 36. E-mail: lkilman@wan.asso.fr

Newspaper circulations world-wide rose 2.57 percent in 2007 while rapid growth of both free titles and on-line platforms is expanding the reach of newspapers everywhere, the World Association of Newspapers announced today (Monday).

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Golden Pen of Freedom Awarded to Chinese Journalist

Pressmeddelanden   •   Jun 03, 2008 08:54 CEST

A Chinese journalist who went to prison for reporting on a health threat before Chinese authorities announced it has been awarded the 2008 Golden Pen of Freedom, the annual press freedom prize of the World Association of Newspapers.

The award to Li Chongqing, who was released from prison in February after serving three years for reporting on an outbreak of dengue fever, marked the second consecutive year that the annual award has gone to a Chinese journalist. It was the first time since WAN created the award in 1961 that journalists from the same country have won it in consecutive years.

Mr Li was unable to obtain a passport and could not attend the award ceremony, held today (2 June) in Göteborg, Sweden. His wife, Bao Dinling, was stopped at the airport in Beijing and prevented by Chinese authorities from attending.

But in remarks read by Li Jianhong, a writer who has been persecuted and arrested and forced to leave China, Mr Li said: "I am deeply aware that this is not an honour only to me in particular, but also an award in general to all of my colleagues who are bravely devoting themselves to freedom of expression, especially those in China."

"The facts that Chinese journalists have gotten the Golden Pen of Freedom Award two years in succession, and that China has become the world's largest jailer of the journalists, have shown that the current situation of free expression in China is of growing concern to the whole world," he said. "China is a land that needs to be travelled with the voices of conscience and a nation that needs to be saved by the truth."

The award was presented by George Brock, President of the World Editors Forum, during the opening ceremonies of the World Newspaper Congress and World Editors Forum, the annual global meetings of the world's press.

"The award was made on the individual merits of Mr Li's case. He went to jail for exposing a serious outbreak of a dangerous disease before the authorities had told the public about it. The Golden Pen of Freedom recognises Mr Li's brave conduct in revealing significant facts in the public interest," said Mr. Brock.

"But Mr Li's case also belongs in a context. China has the dubious distinction of being the world's biggest jailer of journalists," he said. "Despite the promises it made in its successful Olympic bid to improve conditions for journalists, China has continued its repressive policies, cynically believing that neither the Olympic movement nor the international community expects them to honour their promises of reform."

At least 30 journalists and 50 cyber-dissidents remain in Chinese prisons.

Mr Li, who was freed from prison on 2 February, was a reporter and deputy news director of the Fuzhou Daily in Fuzhou City, Fujian Province. He was sentenced to prison in January 2006, for "fabricating and spreading false information", after being detained without charges for nearly a year. The charges stem from a report on the 2004 outbreak of dengue fever in Fuzhou that was posted on Boxun News Network, a Chinese-language website based in the United States.

Due to censorship and restrictions imposed by the Communist Party Propaganda Department on sensitive social issues, no reports of the outbreak in Fuzhou of dengue, a viral, mosquito-borne disease, had been reported in the Chinese press. Nor had health officials officially announced the outbreak.

"In most countries, he would be celebrated and honoured for this work," said Mr Brock. "In China, disclosing such facts is an imprisonable offence."

Mr Li said being a journalist in China "is full of risks. To be a good journalist, one does not only need wisdom but needs moral courage even more."

Mr Li's full remarks can be read at http://www.wan-press.org/article17358.html

Mr Brock's remarks can be found at http://www.wan-press.org/article17323.html

The ceremony was attended by Swedish King Carl XVI Gustaf, ambassadors and other dignitaries. More than 1,500 newspaper publishers, chief editors and other senior newspaper executives are attending the Congress, Forum and Info Expo 2008, which continue through Wednesday. Full details are available at http://www.wansweden2008.com.

The Paris-based WAN, the global organisation for the newspaper industry, defends and promotes press freedom and the professional and business interests of newspapers world-wide. Representing 18,000 newspapers, its membership includes 77 national newspaper associations, newspaper companies and individual newspaper executives in 102 countries, 12 news agencies and 11 regional and world-wide press groups.

Inquiries to: Larry Kilman, Director of Communications, WAN, 7 rue Geoffroy St Hilaire, 75005 Paris France. Tel: +33 1 47 42 85 00. Fax: +33 1 47 42 49 48. Mobile: +33 6 10 28 97 36. E-mail: lkilman@wan.asso.fr

 

 

 

A Chinese journalist who went to prison for reporting on a health threat before Chinese authorities announced it has been awarded the 2008 Golden Pen of Freedom, the annual press freedom prize of the World Association of Newspapers.

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World Newspaper Congress

Pressmeddelanden   •   Maj 31, 2008 13:15 CEST

Newspapers: A Multi-Media, Growth Business. The 2008 summit meetings of the world's press take place in a country which in many ways has a unique place in the history of newspapers - and even today continues to set landmarks for their continued development and growth.

Om World Association of Newspapers

About World Assosiation of Newspapers (WAN)

Founded in 1948, the World Association of Newspapers groups 76 national newspaper associations, individual newspaper executives in 102 nations, 10 news agencies, and 10 regional press organisations. It is a non-profit, non-government organisation.

In all, the Association represents more than 18,000 publications on the five continents.

The World Association of Newspapers has three major objectives:

- Defending and promoting press freedom and the economic independence of newspapers as an essential condition for that freedom.

- Contributing to the development of newspaper publishing by fostering communications and contacts between newspaper executives from different regions and cultures.

- Promoting co-operation between its member organisations, whether national, regional or worldwide.

Adress

  • World Association of Newspapers
  • 7 Rue Geoffrey, St Hillaire
  • 75005 Paris
  • Vår hemsida

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