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​  Heading towards a tsunami of light

​ Heading towards a tsunami of light

Press Releases   •   Mar 19, 2019 07:00 GMT

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have proposed a way to create a brand new source of radiation. Ultra-intense light pulses consist of the motion of a single wave and can be described as a tsunami of light. Their research is now published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

New global standard counts the cost of environmental damage

New global standard counts the cost of environmental damage

Press Releases   •   Mar 18, 2019 07:00 GMT

​Environmental damage costs society enormous amounts of money – and often leaves future generations to foot the bill. Now, a new ISO standard will help companies valuate and manage the impact of their environmental damage, by providing a clear figure for the cost of their goods and services to the environment.

Chalmers officially recognised as an "Engaged University" – the first in Europe

Chalmers officially recognised as an "Engaged University" – the first in Europe

Press Releases   •   Mar 07, 2019 13:35 GMT

After an extensive evaluation process, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has been awarded the title of "Engaged University" by the international agency ACEEU. The accreditation is an acknowledgment of the high quality of Chalmers' methodological work to create value for the surrounding society.

Investigating cell stress for better health – and better beer

Investigating cell stress for better health – and better beer

Press Releases   •   Feb 12, 2019 08:01 GMT

Human beings are not the only ones who suffer from stress – even microorganisms can be affected. Now, researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have devised a new method to study how single biological cells react to stressful situations. Understanding these responses could help develop more effective drugs for serious diseases. The research could even help to brew better beer.

Better architectural design could prevent youth suicide

Better architectural design could prevent youth suicide

Press Releases   •   Feb 11, 2019 07:00 GMT

Suicide among younger people is often so spontaneous that it can be prevented if they do not encounter a potentially dangerous place outdoors. Getting the form of the built environment correct is therefore a very important factor in stopping suicide among young people. This is the finding of Charlotta Thodelius, a researcher at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.

The first dexterous and sentient hand prosthesis has been successfully implanted

The first dexterous and sentient hand prosthesis has been successfully implanted

Press Releases   •   Feb 05, 2019 08:00 GMT

​A female Swedish patient with hand amputation has become the first recipient of an osseo-neuromuscular implant to control a dexterous hand prosthesis. In a pioneering surgery, titanium implants were placed in the two forearm bones (radius and ulnar), from which electrodes to nerves and muscle were extended to extract signals to control a robotic hand and to provide tactile sensations.

New scale for electronegativity rewrites the chemistry textbook

New scale for electronegativity rewrites the chemistry textbook

Press Releases   •   Jan 17, 2019 07:01 GMT

Electronegativity is one of the most well-known models for explaining why chemical reactions occur. Now, Martin Rahm from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has redefined the concept with a new, more comprehensive scale. His work, undertaken with colleagues including a Nobel Prize-winner, has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Breakthrough in organic electronics

Breakthrough in organic electronics

Press Releases   •   Jan 14, 2019 16:00 GMT

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered a simple new tweak that could double the efficiency of organic electronics. OLED-displays, plastic-based solar cells and bioelectronics are just some of the technologies that could benefit from their new discovery, which deals with "double-doped" polymers.

​Organic food worse for the climate

​Organic food worse for the climate

Press Releases   •   Dec 13, 2018 08:45 GMT

Organically farmed food has a bigger climate impact than conventionally farmed food, due to the greater areas of land required. This is the finding of a new international study involving Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, published in the journal Nature.

Artificial joint restores wrist-like movements to forearm amputees

Artificial joint restores wrist-like movements to forearm amputees

Press Releases   •   Nov 28, 2018 07:00 GMT

A new artificial joint restores important wrist-like movements to forearm amputees, something which could dramatically improve their quality of life. A group of researchers led by Max Ortiz Catalan, Associate Professor at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have published their research in the journal IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems & Rehabilitation Engineering.

Removing toxic mercury from contaminated water

Removing toxic mercury from contaminated water

Press Releases   •   Nov 21, 2018 07:00 GMT

Water which has been contaminated with mercury and other toxic heavy metals is a major cause of environmental damage and health problems worldwide. Now, researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, present a totally new way to clean contaminated water, through an electrochemical process. The results are published in the scientific journal Nature Communications.

How to melt gold at room temperature

How to melt gold at room temperature

Press Releases   •   Nov 20, 2018 07:00 GMT

When the tension rises, unexpected things can happen – not least when it comes to gold atoms. Researchers from, among others, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have now managed, for the first time, to make the surface of a gold object melt at room temperature.

Skeletal imitation reveals how bones grow atom-by-atom

Skeletal imitation reveals how bones grow atom-by-atom

Press Releases   •   Nov 19, 2018 07:01 GMT

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered how our bones grow at an atomic level, showing how an unstructured mass orders itself into a perfectly arranged bone structure. The discovery offers insights which could yield improved new implants, as well as increasing our knowledge of bone diseases such as osteoporosis.

Large areas of the Brazilian rainforest at risk of losing protection

Large areas of the Brazilian rainforest at risk of losing protection

Press Releases   •   Nov 14, 2018 07:00 GMT

Up to 15 million hectares of the Brazilian Amazon is at risk of losing its legal protection, according to a new study from researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, and the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. This is equivalent to more than 4 times the entire forest area of the UK.

New research recovers nutrients from seafood process water

New research recovers nutrients from seafood process water

Press Releases   •   Oct 31, 2018 08:01 GMT

Process waters from the seafood industry contain valuable nutrients, that could be used in food or aquaculture feed. But currently, these process waters are treated as waste. Now, a research project from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shows the potential of recycling these nutrients back into the food chain.

Joining forces for a European quantum computer

Joining forces for a European quantum computer

Press Releases   •   Oct 29, 2018 11:00 GMT

Ten international partners will collaborate in a research endeavour to build a high-performance quantum computer, available to a all users. The project, OpenSuperQ, coordinated by Saarland University, is part of the EU’s new €1 billion Flagship initiative on Quantum Technology. Chalmers University of Technology will contribute with knowledge of the primary building blocks of the quantum computers.

Carbon fibre can store energy in the body of a vehicle

Carbon fibre can store energy in the body of a vehicle

Press Releases   •   Oct 18, 2018 07:00 BST

A study has shown that carbon fibres can work as battery electrodes, storing energy directly. This opens up new opportunities for structural batteries, where the carbon fibre becomes part of the energy system. The use of this type of multifunctional material can contribute to a significant weight-reduction in the aircraft and vehicles of the future – a key challenge for electrification.

Understanding catalysts at the atomic level can provide a cleaner environment

Understanding catalysts at the atomic level can provide a cleaner environment

Press Releases   •   Oct 10, 2018 09:32 BST

​By studying materials down to the atomic level, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have found a way to make catalysts more efficient and environmentally friendly. The results have been published in Nature Communications. The methods can be used to improve many different types of catalysts.

BEYOND 2020 – guiding the building sector on the UN 2030 agenda

BEYOND 2020 – guiding the building sector on the UN 2030 agenda

Press Releases   •   Oct 03, 2018 08:00 BST

Gothenburg, Sweden, will be hosting Beyond 2020, the World Sustainable Built Environment Conference, in June 2020. The mission of this large event is to engage the global building sector and set up a roadmap of actions as a guide on how to best contribute to the UN Sustainable Development Goals. The dialogue has already started on the web.

Emissions-free energy system saves heat from the summer sun for winter

Emissions-free energy system saves heat from the summer sun for winter

Press Releases   •   Oct 03, 2018 07:00 BST

​A research group from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has made great, rapid strides towards the development of a specially designed molecule which can store solar energy for later use. These advances have been presented in four scientific articles this year, with the most recent being published in the highly ranked journal Energy & Environmental Science.