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London March for Men

Press Releases   •   May 08, 2017 16:32 BST

Prostate Cancer UK is calling on Londoners to help put their best foot forward and March for Men. Showing his support, British dancer Wayne Sleep, is set to front the march and walk with his family and friends on Saturday 17th June (Father’s Day Weekend) at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London

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Leeds March for Men

Press Releases   •   May 08, 2017 16:26 BST

Prostate Cancer UK is searching for walkers in Leeds to help put their best foot forward and March for Men. Showing her support, former Emmerdale and Holby City actress Gemma Oaten, is set to front the march and walk on the day with her Dad on Sunday 18th June (Father’s Day) at Roundhay Park in Leeds

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Glasgow March for Men

Press Releases   •   May 08, 2017 16:21 BST

Prostate Cancer UK is calling on the people of Scotland to help put their best foot forward and March for Men.

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Unbelievable Jeff will March for Men again for Prostate Cancer UK

Press Releases   •   May 08, 2017 16:15 BST

Intrepid television presenter Jeff Stelling will lace up his walking boots once more in another unbelievable walking challenge for Prostate Cancer UK.

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Fuller’s launches Wise Men beer to raise money for Prostate Cancer UK

Press Releases   •   Dec 06, 2016 14:37 GMT

Fuller, Smith & Turner, the London brewer and premium pub company, has launched Wise Men – a seasonal beer that will also raise money for Prostate Cancer UK

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South Cornwall pub named Prostate Cancer UK’s favourite local

Press Releases   •   Dec 05, 2016 16:46 GMT

The Par Inn in Par, South Cornwall has been named as Prostate Cancer UK’s favourite local!

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Prostate cancer patients ‘abandoned to deal with erection problems alone’ - Prostate Cancer UK warns

Press Releases   •   Nov 17, 2016 15:09 GMT

Thousands of prostate cancer survivors affected by erectile dysfunction are being abandoned without adequate support, new Freedom of Information (FOI) data obtained by Prostate Cancer UK has revealed.

Today, the UK’s leading men’s health charity has issued a warning that patchy, insufficient care for erection problems is leaving men across the country with unnecessary long term physical and psychological damage, and is calling on the nation to take action by campaigning for better care in their area.

Erectile dysfunction is a common side effect of prostate cancer treatment, affecting 76% of men who have been treated for the disease1 but it can often be treated if the right care is available.

However, the results of recent FOI requests issued by Prostate Cancer UK2 reveal a dramatic post code lottery of support with just 13% of local health commissioners across the UK providing the breadth of treatment and services needed to give men living with this challenging condition the best chance of recovery. These findings are reinforced by the results of a survey of over 500 men with erectile dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment3, in which as many as 1 in 4 (24%) men claimed no one offered them support or medication to deal with the issue.

John Robertson, Specialist Nurse at Prostate Cancer UK said; “When it comes to treating erectile dysfunction following prostate cancer treatment, early support and treatment is vital.

“As a specialist nurse, I regularly speak to men at rock bottom because they can no longer get or maintain an erection. Not only can it put a complete stop to a man’s sex life, it can have devastating longer term implications including depression and relationship breakdowns. It is therefore incredibly concerning that only a handful of men are getting the support needed to overcome this condition and it’s shocking that in some areas men aren’t getting any support whatsoever.”

It is the responsibility of commissioners (CCGs in England, Health Boards in Scotland and Wales and Health & Social Care Trusts in Northern Ireland) to bring about change at a local level. In a bid to put a stop to the wide disparity in care, Prostate Cancer UK is calling on the public to put urgent pressure on health funders in the worst performing areas to ensure they are held accountable for improving access to treatments and support.

Recent treatment guidance for erectile dysfunction produced by Prostate Cancer UK and Macmillan Cancer Support recommends early intervention and a choice of five treatment and support options in order to give men the best chance of recovery4. Treatment and support should include access to a NHS erectile dysfunction clinic, an appropriate choice of medication including daily low dose tadalafil (Cialis®), vacuum pumps, and access to psychosexual clinics and counselling services. Erectile dysfunction clinics are widely regarded as the most essential service, as they provide support across both physical and emotional needs and help men to understand what they should expect at each stage of their recovery. However, the FOI results revealed that only half (51%) of commissioners could confirm that they offer this as an option. Two commissioners admitted that they offer no support whatsoever and almost 1 in 5 (17%) were completely unaware of the arrangements in their area. 17 commissioners failed to provide satisfactory information for all questions raised in the request.

Robertson continued; “This is an issue that has been swept under the carpet for too long and thousands of men have been left to suffer in silence. Erectile dysfunction is a debilitating health condition and it must be taken seriously by the NHS and commissioning groups. Now is the time to take action – everyone can do their bit to make sure men across the country get access to the vital support they need.”

Brian White from Leeds (42) was diagnosed with prostate cancer at the age of 41. He had an operation to remove his prostate in October 2015.

“My partner and I were made fully aware of the possible side effects – incontinence and erectile dysfunction, but at the time I was so focussed on getting rid of the cancer – the longer term implications didn’t really come into question.

“One year down the line and I’m still in remission but I’m living with the harsh side effects of my treatment. Thankfully my incontinence is much better but I’m still struggling with erections. I’m only 42 and my partner is 36. Sex and intimacy is so important to us, as it is to most relationships and adjusting to a different way of life has been incredibly difficult. The spontaneity of our sexual relationship has gone and now every intimate moment has to be planned well in advance.

“Things are certainly improving but the road to recovery is a long one. I want to make everyone aware that support for erectile problems shouldn’t be a ‘nice to have’ - it’s essential. Before any man undergoes treatment for prostate cancer he needs to be safe in knowledge that there is appropriate care on the other side to help him with the aftermath. The fact that some men don’t get access to any support whatsoever is shocking.”

To join the fight and campaign for better care for men in your area, visit: bettercare.prostatecanceruk.org

For further information on erectile dysfunction visit: prostatecanceruk.org/erectiledysfunction or speak to Prostate Cancer UK’s Specialist Nurses on 0800 074 8383.

Ends

Notes to Editors

References:

1. Prostate Cancer UK. Men’s views on quality care in prostate cancer: What does good quality care mean for men with prostate cancer? Total sample size was 610 UK men. Fieldwork was undertaken between October 2011 and January 2012 [Internet]. 2012. Available from: http://prostatecanceruk.org/media/2491129/prostate_cancer_uk_quality_care_survey_report_june_2012.pdf

2. Prostate Cancer UK submitted Freedom of Information requests to 235 commissioners (CCGs in England, Health Boards in Wales and Scotland and Health & Social Care Trusts in Northern Ireland) across the UK through the ‘What Do They Know’ website asking if they commissioned a number of erectile dysfunction treatments and support services focusing on the 5 identified erectile dysfunction support services.The response rate was 98.7%. Requests were undertaken between May and June 2016. An example FOI request can be viewed here: https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/erectile_dysfunction_service_pro_6?nocache=incoming-811116#incoming-811116

3. Prostate Cancer UK. Erectile Dysfunction After Prostate Cancer Treatment. Total sample size was 561 men and 54 partners. Fieldwork was undertaken between August 2013 and March 2014. The survey was carried out online and on paper. 2014

4. Macmillan Cancer Support and Prostate Cancer UK. Treating erectile dysfunction after radical radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. A quick guide for health professionals: supporting men with erectile dysfunction [Internet]. 2015. Available from: http://prostatecanceruk.org/for-health-professionals/guidelines/erectile-dysfunction-after-surgery

Macmillan Cancer Support and Prostate Cancer UK. Treating erectile dysfunction after surgery for pelvic cancers. A quick guide for health professionals: supporting men with erectile dysfunction [Internet]. 2015. Available from: http://prostatecanceruk.org/for-health-professionals/guidelines/erectile-dysfunction-after-surgery

FOI results:

Table 1: List of UK local commissioners (CCGs in England, Health Boards in Scotland and Wales, or Health & Social Care Trusts Northern Ireland) that provide the least support for men with erectile dysfunction as a result of prostate cancer treatment in the UK (between 0-2 ED services and do not offer ED Clinic) and 20-year prostate cancer prevalence (number of men living with and after a diagnosis of prostate cancer).

Commissioner (ranked by the number of ED services provided) Number of ED services provided out of a maximum of 5 20-year prevalence (number of men) 20-year prevalence (age-standardised rate per 100,000 men) The rate can be used to directly compare areas of different population size
Northern Health and Social Care Trust (Northern Ireland) 0 1722 732
Western Isles Health Board 0 136 1000
NHS Castle Point, Rayleigh and Rochford CCG 1 991 1181
NHS Ealing CCG 1 1042 623
NHS Heywood, Middleton & Rochdale CCG 1 901 873
NHS High Weald Lewes Havens CCG 1 909 1134
NHS Hillingdon CCG 1 897 673
NHS Hounslow CCG 1 608 487
NHS Mid Essex CCG 1 1832 992
NHS North East Essex CCG 1 1442 953
NHS Oxfordshire CCG 1 3024 964
NHS Southend CCG 1 841 1000
NHS Vale of York CCG 1 1961 1184
NHS Wandsworth CCG 1 1024 698
NHS West Hampshire CCG 1 3341 1278
Southern Health and Social Care Trust (Northern Ireland) 1 1288 719
Orkney Health Board 1 81 774
NHS Harrogate and Rural District CCG 2 1054 1367
NHS Hastings & Rother CCG 2 853 986
NHS Stockport CCG 2 1635 1186
NHS Warwickshire North CCG 2 840 915

Sources of prevalence data:

Public Health England/Macmillan Cancer Support. Macmillan-NCIN Cancer Prevalence Project. 20-year cancer prevalence in the UK (as of 2010) - England/Scotland/Northern Ireland Cancer Prevalence Tables [Internet]. 2015 [cited 2016 Nov 9]. Available from: http://www.ncin.org.uk/about_ncin/segmentation

About Prostate Cancer UK

Prostate Cancer UK leads the fight against prostate cancer. We fund ground-breaking research, drive improvements in treatment, and fight injustice in care. Now we’ve set ourselves the toughest challenge yet: to stop prostate cancer being a killer.

Through shifting the science over the next 10 years to focus on radical improvements in diagnosis, treatment, prevention and support, we can make prostate cancer a disease the next generation of men need not fear.

Whilst we focus on the future we must also ensure better support for all men now. Prostate Cancer UK has a number of programmes aimed at reducing unacceptable regional variation in treatment and care throughout a man’s journey with the disease.

Prostate cancer statistics:

  • 11,287 men die from prostate cancer in the UK each year. That's one man every hour.
  • It’s the most common cancer in men, with 330,000 living with and after the disease in the UK.
  • Prostate cancer is set to become the most commonly diagnosed cancer of all in the UK in 2030 - which is why we must all act now to curb its power to kill.
  • Men over 50, black men and men with a family history of prostate cancer all face a higher than average risk of the disease.
  • Prostate cancer treatment often causes devastating, long term side-effects.Incontinence and erectile dysfunction strike at the heart of what it means to be a man.
  • Anyone with concerns about prostate cancer may contact Prostate Cancer UK's Specialist Nurses in confidence on 0800 074 8383 or online via the Live Chat instant messaging service: www.prostatecanceruk.org. The Specialist Nurse phone service is free to landlines and open from 9am to 6pm Monday to Friday with late opening until 8pm on Wednesdays.
  • Visit www.prostatecanceruk.org now to help beat this disease.

Prostate Cancer UK is the UK’s largest men’s health charity. We aim to help more men survive prostate cancer and enjoy a better quality of life.

Prostate Cancer UK, the UK’s leading men’s health charity, has issued a warning that patchy, insufficient care for erection problems is leaving men across the country with unnecessary long term physical and psychological damage, and is calling on the nation to take action by campaigning for better care in their area.

Read more »
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Men’s health charity unveils 10 year 'endgame' to halve prostate cancer deaths by 2026

Press Releases   •   Feb 26, 2016 08:49 GMT

A leading men’s health organisation today revealed its action plan to halve prostate cancer deaths within a decade1 – and it warned that the number of men in the UK dying from the disease will soar by a third unless urgent action is taken2.

If the rising death trend continues, by 2026 prostate cancer will kill over 14,500 men every year, almost 4,000 more than the 10,900 it kills annually today. However, the charity estimates that deaths could be cut in half if the key areas of improving diagnosis and treatment can be resolved in the next ten years.

Inrevealing the 10-year plan - hailed as ‘game-changing’ by a group of leading scientists and clinicians from the world of cancer research - Prostate Cancer UK’s Chief Executive Angela Culhane outlined the strategy that will counter the trend and move the disease dramatically closer to becoming something that men no longer need to fear.

”The urgent objective is to shift the science and change prostate cancer from a killer into something a man can live with – taming it so that it becomes a disease our sons and grandsons will not be afraid of”, she said.

“This is the endgame. We’re on the brink of the scientific breakthroughs necessary to stop this disease in its tracks so that by 2026 it won’t pose the threat it does today.

“Right now prostate cancer kills a man every hour in the UK and that figure is set to rise. One in three men diagnosed with the disease currently dies from it3, putting survival rates for our men behind most of Europe. It’s scandalous and we can’t let it continue.”

To achieve its ambition, the charity is now targeting all its research firepower on three key areas; diagnosis, treatment and prevention. As its first priority, it today announced plans to commit £2million to crack the problems that surround diagnosis which are blamed for many of the UK’s prostate cancer deaths. It has assembled an international taskforce of leading scientists to develop a new risk screening tool which can be used as a first-line detector to establish underlying risk of aggressive prostate cancer4. The tool aims to revolutionise diagnosis so that no man’s cancer is missed before it is too late, as well as ensuring men won’t have to endure invasive and sometimes painful biopsies unnecessarily. It is expected to be in the hands of all GPs in the UK within the next five years.

Culhane continued: “With the right resources, we are confident that we can move the science forward to halve the number of men who die from prostate cancer within a decade.But research isn’t cheap and this is a race against time. We’ve got 10 years to make history and we’re calling on everyone who thinks men’s lives are worth saving to help fund this final assault that will tame prostate cancer for good.”

Last night, at a gathering of some of the biggest names in prostate cancer research and treatment, chaired by Professor Robert Winston, Prostate Cancer UK detailed how the lifesaving plan would be delivered.

Professor Winston commented; “When you get to my age prostate cancer is one those things that becomes a real threat. So this plan is game-changing. If prostate cancer can be brought to a standstill within my lifetime and reduced to something that my sons and my grandsons need not fear, that’s big news. But Prostate Cancer UK needs our support to get there. We have a historic opportunity which we’d be crazy to miss”.

Panellist Professor Malcolm Mason, Professor of Clinical Oncology at Cardiff University said; “Prostate Cancer UK is taking a bold lead and concentrating everyone’s minds with the 10-year timeframe. Year on year we take another step towards beating prostate cancer, in all sorts of ways, from finding new treatments, to developing better tests. Now is the time for the UK to get behind Prostate Cancer UK’s final push to nail the answers which we know are in reach. We’ve got a number of hurdles to clear, but I’m confident that this can be achieved within the decade with the right commitment from clinicians, scientists and funders.”

Professor Mason was joined on the panel by Professor Johann de Bono, Professor of Experimental Cancer Medicine, Institute of Cancer Research; Professor Joe O’Sullivan, Professor of Radiation Oncology, Queen’s University Belfast; Mr Ben Challacombe, Consultant Urologist, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust; Professor Martin Roland, RAND Professor of Health Services Research, Institute of Public Health; Professor Charlotte Bevan, Professor of Cancer Biology, Imperial College London; Professor Alison Richardson, Clinical Professor of Cancer Nursing and End of Life Care, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust; Chris Hopson, CEO of NHS Providers; Dr Iain Frame, Director of Research at Prostate Cancer UK; Heather Blake, Director of Support and Influencing at Prostate Cancer UK.

Assessing risk and improving diagnosis is just one area of focus for Prostate Cancer UK. In order to achieve its 10 year goal, the charity is also prioritising the development of better treatments and establishing better prevention strategies, and working to ensure that all men are able to access the best care and support both now and in future:

  • Better treatments: Identifying and tailoring the right treatment for each individual man’s cancer and working out how best to use existing medicines, as well as funding the development of new ‘personalised’ treatments, with fewer side effects.
  • Better prevention: Pinpointing what triggers prostate cancer and what makes it tick. Gaining a greater understanding of the genetic changes that drive prostate cancer to become aggressive will be instrumental in this.
  • Better support:Working in partnership with health services and supporting men to ensure that everyone knows what the best standard of care is and that all men across the UK have access to it.

Further information on Prostate Cancer UK’s strategy, Ten years to tame prostate cancer, can be accessed at www.prostatecanceruk.org/10yearstrategy which will be live from 26/02/16.

Ends

References

1 Prostate Cancer UK’s 10-year objective to reduce deaths by 50% is a projection based on the charity’s plan to shift the science in targeted areas by 2026. The projection is based on where the science is now and where Prostate Cancer UK calculates it will be in a decade with the right commitment from the research community and funders. The following criteria have been factored in:

  • The number of men diagnosed with prostate cancer is increasing (GLOBOCAN, 2012), but if Prostate Cancer UK delivers the ‘better diagnosis’ strand of its strategy as planned, the percentage of cancers diagnosed at an earlier stage will increase. This is crucial because only 22% of men diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer survive for 10 years. Conversely 98% of men who are diagnosed at the earliest stage (with localised disease) survive for 10 years (PHE, 2013).
  • Increasing investment in research to develop better treatments will ensure more men get effective treatment that increases their life expectancy, regardless of the stage of disease at diagnosis.
  • Increasing the investment in research around the prevention of recurrent cancers.
  • Prostate Cancer UK calculates that it will need to fund £150million of research in the key areas to deliver the projected result.

2 On average, 10,954 men die every year from prostate cancer in the UK [2011-2013] (ONS, Northern Ireland Cancer Registry, ISD Scotland & Public Health Wales). It’s predicted that by 2025, this figure will rise by 3,625 to 14,579 (GLOBOCAN, 2012) – a 33% increase.

3 Lloyd T, Hounsome L, Mehay A, Mee S, Verne J, Cooper A. Lifetime risk of being diagnosed with, or dying from, prostate cancer by major ethnic group in England 2008–2010. BMC Medicine. 2015 Jul 30;13(1):171.

4 Details about the risk tool:

The new tool will combine factors such as PSA score, underlying risk of prostate cancer, and life-expectancy measures in order to draw out those men at greatest danger from aggressive disease so that they can be put forward for further tests, whilst sparing those at lowest risk the need to undergo painful biopsies and the possibility of undergoing treatment for a disease that would never kill them. The aim is that the tool would be ready for clinical trials within the next three years and in the hands of GPs within the next five.

Key headline statistics

  • Over 10,000 men die from prostate cancer in the UK each year. That's one man every hour.
  • It’s the most common cancer in men, with 330,000 living with and after the disease in the UK.
  • Prostate cancer is set to become the most commonly diagnosed cancer of all in the UK in 2030 - which is why we must all act now to curb its power to kill.
  • Prostate cancer treatment often causes devastating, long term side-effects.Incontinence and erectile dysfunction strike at the heart of what it means to be a man.
  • Anyone with concerns about prostate cancer may contact Prostate Cancer UK's Specialist Nurses in confidence on 0800 074 8383 or online via the Live Chat instant messaging service: www.prostatecanceruk.org. The Specialist Nurse phone service is free to landlines and open from 9am to 6pm Monday to Friday with late opening until 8pm on Wednesdays.
  • Visit www.prostatecanceruk.org now to help beat this disease.

About Prostate Cancer UK

Prostate Cancer UK has a simple ambition – to stop men dying from prostate cancer.

Through shifting the science over the next 10 years to focus on radical improvements in diagnosis, treatment, prevention and support, we can make prostate cancer a disease the next generation of men need not fear. Standing against injustice, Men United is Prostate Cancer UK’s movement for everyone who believes that men are worth fighting for. Already more than a quarter of a million strong, Men United will help Prostate Cancer UK raise its game - and the funds vital to beat this disease. Working together, we can stop prostate cancer in its tracks.

To join the quarter of a million people already fighting for the disease and to help tame prostate cancer in ten years visit: menunited.prostatecanceruk.org

Further details on Prostate Cancer UK’s research priorities for the next ten years can be found here: http://prostatecanceruk.org/media/2492205/research-strategy-3-priority-areas.pdf

A leading men’s health organisation today revealed its action plan to halve prostate cancer deaths within a decade1 – and it warned that the number of men in the UK dying from the disease will soar by a third unless urgent action is taken2.

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Walking 10 marathons in 10 days in March? That’s unbelievable Jeff

Press Releases   •   Jan 09, 2016 12:00 GMT

​Intrepid television presenter Jeff Stelling will embark on an epic charity walk in March to help tame prostate cancer. Teaming up with leading men’s health organisation Prostate Cancer UK, the long-standing Soccer Saturday host will complete 10 walking marathons in 10 days, from boyhood club Hartlepool United to Wembley between March 21-30.

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Olympic star teams up with Prostate Cancer UK for Go Dad Run

Press Releases   •   Dec 16, 2015 16:07 GMT

Olympic hero Colin Jackson has once again teamed up with Prostate Cancer UK to deliver a series of fundraising runs for men and boys next June.

In 2016 and 2017, Prostate Cancer UK will continue to be the Official Charity Partner of the Sanlam Go Dad Run, a series of fun 5km and 10km jaunts designed to bring male members of the family together, alongside their friends, teammates and work colleagues.

Launched in 2013, Go Dad Run is the brainchild of the former triple world champion and Olympic 110m hurdles silver medallist who created it after two of his uncles suffered with prostate cancer.

The fourth year of events will see men and boys compete in London, Bristol, Cardiff, Sunderland, the Isle of Man and Worcester – and registration is already open for many of the runs at godadrun.co.uk.

Exciting new changes for 2016 include the introduction of 10km runs, a full chip timing service for all registered runners and a brand new team competition.

When they arrive at the events the registered runners will all collect their free PUMA T-shirt and iconic blue Y-fronts to wear over their shorts, and after they cross the finish line they will be handed a medal and a Big Yellow Sports Bag.

Prostate Cancer UK are proud to be the Official Charity Partner of the event in both 2016 and 2017, with legendary hurdling ace Jackson aiming to build on the £50,000 raised to date and help the fight back against a disease that kills one man every hour in the UK.

He said: "I'm excited to continue our relationship with Prostate Cancer UK because it is a charity that is very close to my heart.

“A few years ago two of my uncles developed prostate cancer and although one responded to treatment and is now fit and well again the other was less fortunate and, sadly, passed away. That prompted me to find out more information about the illness and I was shocked to discover that whilst 1 in 8 men in the UK will develop prostate cancer, that actually rises to 1 in 4 men from an African Caribbean background.

“By bringing together dads and sons, brothers and cousins, neighbours, workmates and friends who are willing to get involved in a run and play their part in the fight against prostate cancer we hope that we can have a positive effect on their lives and health.

“Signing a new two-year partnership agreement also means that we can be very creative with our joint long term plans as we move forward with the Sanlam Go Dad Run and raise awareness of and funds for Prostate Cancer UK.

“We hope that thousands of men and boys will register for our 5K and 10K runs next June."

With prostate cancer affecting 330,000 men across the UK each year, the Sanlam Go Dad Runs will pull together men and boys of all ages in a bid to emulate the success of the female-themed Race for Life.

Held throughout June and culminating with runs in London and Cardiff on one of the most significant dates on the calendar, Father’s Day, June 19th, it will also be a family day out across the six venues with vocal crowds encouraged to cheer on the runners.

The 5km runs will set off at 10.30am across the six venues, priced £16.50 for men 18 years and over, while boys aged 10-17 pay £11.50 when entering at the same time as an adult. Boys up to the age of nine do not need to register or pay and can collect their number on the day if accompanied by an adult.

The 10km events begin at 10.45am and are priced £21.50 for men and boys aged 16 and over. Men can register now at godadrun.co.uk.

James Beeby, Director of Fundraising for Prostate Cancer UK, said: “Colin’s been a big supporter of ours for many years, and has seen first hand the dangers of this disease, so we are delighted to once again throw our support behind this exciting event.

“Go Dad Run is not about winning, it’s not just about setting personal bests, it’s about families uniting and having fun. This army of men of all ages in London, Cardiff, Bristol, Worcester, Sunderland and the Isle of Man are the perfect example of what we call Men United; guys getting together and doing something great to bear prostate cancer.

“Father’s Day as a focus also offers a stark reminder of the importance of family. Prostate cancer affects fathers, grandfathers, uncles and sons – but also mums, grandmothers, sisters and daughters. One man every hour dies from prostate cancer, but getting behind an event like this will help us strike back.”

-ends-

NOTES TO EDITOR

For more information, please contact Gary Haines, Sport PR Manager at Prostate Cancer UK, on 020 3310 7079 or at gary.haines@prostatecanceruk.org.

About Men United and Prostate Cancer UK: 


o Men deserve better. Men United is Prostate Cancer UK’s movement for everyone who believe that men are worth fighting for, to help us beat prostate cancer and keep friendships alive. Some 230,000 people have engaged with Men United since 2014.
o Men United has tons of fun ways for people to see their mates, from bike rides, sponsored walks, BBQs and quiz nights - all whilst doing something great for Prostate Cancer UK.
o Search Men United, or visit prostatecanceruk.org/menunited
o Prostate Cancer UK works to get men in all areas of the country the early detection, effective diagnosis and better treatments that will beat this disease.
o Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. More than 10,000 men die every year from this male-only disease, and 330,000 men are living with prostate cancer in the UK.
o Anyone with concerns about prostate cancer can contact Prostate Cancer UK's Specialist Nurses in confidence on 0800 074 8383 or via the online Live Chat, instant messaging service: www.prostatecanceruk.org/. The Specialist Nurse phone service is free to landlines and open from 9am to 6pm Monday to Friday with late opening until 8pm on Wednesdays.


About Go Dad Run:

  • The Sanlam Go Dad Run is a series of 5km and 10km runs for men and boys to raise awareness of and funds for Prostate Cancer UK.
    • Go Dad Runs are open to all men and boys of any age, and we hope that lots of fathers, sons, brothers, partners, friends, neighbours, work colleagues and teammates will join us and take part.
    • In 2016 all runners will be chip timed and an extensive breakdown of information will be available after the events.
    • For more information please contact godadruninfo@gmail.com
  • Olympic hero Colin Jackson has once again teamed up with Prostate Cancer UK to deliver a series of fundraising runs for men and boys next June.

    Read more »

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    About Prostate Cancer UK

    Men deserve better. It’s that simple.

    We're the UK’s largest men’s health charity. We aim to help more men survive prostate cancer and enjoy a better quality of life.

    Address

    • Prostate Cancer UK
    • The Counting House, 53 Tooley Street
    • SE1 2QN London
    • United Kingdom

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