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Ivan Mijakovic, Professor at the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers

Ivan Mijakovic, Professor at the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers

Apr 16, 2018 08:00 BST

“Something else that’s becoming big, and I think is going to be very important in the future, is so-called ‘biosensing’. Graphene conducts electricity, which means it can be used to detect problems in the body, such as bacterial problems, cancer, or elevated glucose levels. It gives us a whole new way of preventing health problems,” says Chalmers Professor Ivan Mijakovic.

But more research is needed on health risks

But more research is needed on health risks

Apr 16, 2018 08:00 BST

"More research is needed before we can claim it is entirely safe. Among other things, we know that graphene does not degrade easily,” says Jie Sun, Associate Professor at the Department of Micro Technology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology.

Santosh Pandit, postdoc at the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering

Santosh Pandit, postdoc at the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering

Apr 16, 2018 08:00 BST

Santosh Pandit, postdoctoral researcher at Chalmers, had expected the graphene flakes to harm human cells as well: "It surprised me that we have not seen any damage at all," he says.

Jie Sun, Associate Professor at Micro Technology and Nanoscience

Jie Sun, Associate Professor at Micro Technology and Nanoscience

Apr 16, 2018 08:00 BST

Associate Professor Jie Sun has long experience in graphene research, and is proud of the research results. "I was surprised at how effectively graphene killed the bacteria," he says.

Graphene research demands high class cleanrooms

Graphene research demands high class cleanrooms

Apr 16, 2018 08:00 BST

Graphene is made of carbon atoms. It is only a single atomic layer thick, and therefore the graphene flakes form the world's sharpest knives. In the so-called ‘clean room’, micro and nano technologies, including graphene, are researched.

Focusing on other biological applications for graphene

Focusing on other biological applications for graphene

Apr 16, 2018 08:00 BST

Chalmers University is a leader in the area of graphene research, but did not start to study the biological applications until a couple of years ago. Now the researchers believe that graphene shows great potential for different healthcare applications.

The first to use vertical graphene to kill bacteria

The first to use vertical graphene to kill bacteria

Apr 16, 2018 08:00 BST

The vertical flakes of graphene are not a new invention. But the Chalmers research teams are the first to use vertical graphene to kill bacteria. The next step will be to test the graphene flakes further, by coating implant surfaces and studying the effect on animal cells.

Wendy Johnson and friends | Wendy Johnson a ffrindiau

Wendy Johnson and friends | Wendy Johnson a ffrindiau

Mar 27, 2018 15:35 BST

Claire and Gary Edwards-Matthews from Morriston and Wendy and David Johnson from Llansamlet will be tackling the 26 mile Virgin Money London marathon in honour of Wendy’s sister who had a stroke at just 51. Bydd Claire a Gary Edwards-Matthews o Dreforys a Wendy a David Johnson o Lansamlet yn mynd i’r afael â marathon Virgin Money Llundain yn enw chwaer Wendy, a chafodd strôc pan oedd yn 51 mlwydd oed.

DEM.LIGHT project

DEM.LIGHT project

Jan 11, 2018 08:03 GMT

Researchers DEM.LIGHT project

Researchers DEM.LIGHT project

Jan 11, 2018 08:03 GMT