Press Releases

Cellulose from wood can be printed in 3D

Jun 17, 2015 07:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology ​A group of researchers have managed to print and dry three-dimensional objects made entirely by cellulose for the first time with the help of a 3D-bioprinter. They also added carbon nanotubes to create electrically conductive material. The effect is that raw material based on wood will be able to compete with fossil-based plastics and metals in the on-going additive manufacturing revolution.

Jun 04, 2015 10:29 BST Uppsala University In many animal species, the chromosomes differ between the sexes. The male has a Y chromosome. In some animals, however, for example birds, it is the other way round. In birds, the females have their own sex chromosome, the W chromosome. For the first, researchers in Uppsala have mapped the genetic structure and evolution of the W chromosome.

Sharp-eyed Alma spots a flare on famous red giant star

May 29, 2015 07:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology ​Super-sharp observations with the telescope Alma have revealed what seems to be a gigantic flare on the surface of Mira, one of the closest red giant stars in the sky. Activity like this in red giants – similar to what we see in the Sun – comes as a surprise to astronomers. The discovery could help explain how winds from giant stars make their contribution to our galaxy’s ecosystem.

May 06, 2015 18:00 BST Uppsala University In a new study, published in Nature this week, a research team led from Uppsala University in Sweden presents the discovery of a new microbe that represents a missing link in the evolution of complex life. The study provides a new understanding of how, billions of years ago, the complex cell types that comprise plants, fungi, but also animals and humans, evolved from simple microbes.

Safer travels and implants with Desyre systems

May 05, 2015 07:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology The Desyre project developed a novel Desyre system-on-chip architecture and underlying concepts for reliability. Desyre’s industry partners are now using the new concepts to help create safer cars and trains, medical devices that can live longer and are more reliable, brain models that are more advanced, and even easier-to-program embedded many-core systems.

Apr 29, 2015 07:20 BST Uppsala University Recombination, or crossing-over, occurs when sperm and egg cells are formed and segments of each chromosome pair are interchanged. This process plays an crucial role in the maintanance of genetic variation. Researchers at the Biomedical Centre, Uppsala University, have studied recombination in honeybees. The extreme recombination rates found in this species seem to be crucial for their survival.

Astronomers reveal supermassive black hole’s intense magnetic field

Apr 16, 2015 19:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology Astronomers from Chalmers University of Technology have used the giant telescope Alma to reveal an extremely powerful magnetic field very close to a supermassive black hole in a distant galaxy. The results appear in the 17 April 2015 issue of the journal Science.

Apr 16, 2015 17:00 BST Uppsala University A key question in the climate debate is how the occurrence and distribution of species is affected by climate change. But without information about natural variation in species abundance it is hard to answer. In a major study, published today in the leading scientific journal Current Biology, researchers can now for the first time give us a detailed picture of natural variation.

Graphene looking promising for future spintronic devices

Apr 10, 2015 10:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have discovered that large area graphene is able to preserve electron spin over an extended period, and communicate it over greater distances than had previously been known. This has opened the door for the development of spintronics. The findings have been published in the journal Nature Communications.

Eggs and chicken instead of beef reap major climate gains

Apr 01, 2015 07:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology Beef on our plates is one of the biggest climate villains, but that does not mean we have to adopt a vegan diet to reach climate goals. Research results from Chalmers University of Technology show that adopting a diet in which the protein derives from poultry is a smart and inexpensive way to reduce our impact on the climate.