Press Releases

Graphene Flagship welcomes first associated members

Oct 27, 2014 07:00 GMT Chalmers University of Technology As part of its mission to strengthen Europe's graphene research and development community, the Graphene Flagship welcomes its first four associated members: Netzsch (Germany), NetComposites (UK), ABB and Imerys (Switzerland).

Global consumption an increasingly significant driver of tropical deforestation

Oct 22, 2014 15:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology International trade with agricultural and wood products is an increasingly important driver of tropical deforestation. More than a third of recent deforestation can be tied to production of beef, soy, palm oil and timber. “The trend is clear, the drivers of deforestation have been globalized and commercialized”, says assistant professor Martin Persson, Chalmers University of Technology.

PCR setup automation for your bench: Find out how easy it can be!

Oct 21, 2014 13:57 BST Hamilton Robotics GB and Ireland Equipped with dedicated control software, the new PCR setup NIMBUS combines the intuitive approach of a manually created PCR with the benefits of automation, doing the cumbersome work in the background.

Light bending material facilitates the search for new particles

Oct 16, 2014 16:09 BST Chalmers University of Technology Particle physicists have a hard time identifying all the elementary particles created in their particle accelerators. But now researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have designed a material that makes it much easier to distinguish the particles.

Mind-controlled prosthetic arms that work in daily life are now a reality

Oct 08, 2014 19:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology For the first time, robotic prostheses controlled via implanted neuromuscular interfaces have become a clinical reality. A novel osseointegrated (bone-anchored) implant system gives patients new opportunities in their daily life and professional activities.

Oct 08, 2014 07:03 BST Uppsala University New research at Uppsala University shows that plasmids containing genes that confer resistance to antibiotics can be enriched by very low concentrations of antibiotics and heavy metals. These results strengthen the suspicion that the antibiotic residues and heavy metals (such as arsenic, silver and copper) that are spread in the environment are contributing to the problems of resistance.

Thermotolerant yeast can provide more climate-smart ethanol

Oct 02, 2014 19:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology With a simple mutation, yeast can grow in higher than normal temperatures. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology demonstrate this in an article in the scientific journal Science. The findings may result in ethanol being more effectively manufactured for vehicle fuel, as well as increase the possibility of using residual waste as a raw material.

Sep 29, 2014 07:10 BST Uppsala University Present-day lithium batteries are efficient but involve a range of resource and environmental problems. Using materials from alfalfa (lucerne seed) and pine resin and a clever recycling strategy, Uppsala researchers have now come up with a highly interesting alternative. Their study will be presented soon in the scientific journal ChemSusChem.

The sound of an atom has been captured

Sep 12, 2014 08:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology are first to show the use of sound to communicate with an artificial atom. They can thereby demonstrate phenomena from quantum physics with sound taking on the role of light. The results are published by the journal Science.

New research reveals how wild rabbits were genetically transformed into tame rabbits

Aug 28, 2014 19:00 BST Uppsala University The genetic changes that transformed wild animals into domesticated forms have long been a mystery. An international team of scientists has now made a breakthrough by showing that many genes controlling the development of the brain and the nervous system were particularly important for rabbit domestication. The study is published today in Science and gives answers to many genetic questions.