Images

Industrial robot in motion

Aug 24, 2015 07:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology By minimizing the acceleration of industrial robots, and optimizing the sequence of multiple robots, energy consumption can be reduced by up to 40 percent. In robot-intensive manufacturing industries, such as bodywork factories in the automotive industry, robots consume about half of the total energy used for production, which means optimization could lead to potentially significant savings.

Kristofer Bengtsson, Emma Vidarsson and Bengt Lennartson 2

Aug 24, 2015 07:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology From left: Dr Kristofer Bengtsson, master’s student Emma Vidarsson and Professor Bengt Lennartson in the Robotics and Automation Laboratory at Chalmers University of Technology. The research group at the Department of Signals and Systems also includes PhD students Oskar Wigström and Sarmad Riazi. The optimization tool is being developed in the EU research project Areus.

Kristofer Bengtsson, Emma Vidarsson and Bengt Lennartson 1

Aug 24, 2015 07:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology From left: Dr Kristofer Bengtsson, master’s student Emma Vidarsson and Professor Bengt Lennartson in the Robotics and Automation Laboratory at Chalmers University of Technology. The research group at the Department of Signals and Systems also includes PhD students Oskar Wigström and Sarmad Riazi. The optimization tool is being developed in the EU research project Areus.

Graphene-based film on an electronic component

Jul 10, 2015 05:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology Graphene-based film on an electronic component with high heat intensity.

Cooling of electronics using graphene-based film

Jul 10, 2015 05:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology Silane coupling between the graphene and the silicon (an electronic component). After heating and hydrolysis of (3-Aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES) molecules, silane coupling is created, which provides mechanic strength and good thermal pathways.

Conductive nanocellulose gel next to customary nanocellulose gel

Jun 17, 2015 07:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology Conductive nanocellulose gel (black) made conductive by carbon nanotubes, next to customary nanocellulose gel (clear).

Paul Gatenholm

Jun 17, 2015 07:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology Paul Gatenholm next to the 3D bioprinter at Chalmers University of Technology.

A cellulose object printed using a 3D bioprinter

Jun 17, 2015 07:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology The tiny chair made of cellulose is a demonstrational object, printed using the 3D bioprinter at Chalmers University of Technology.

A circuit made up of cellulose and carbon nanotubes, printed using a 3D bioprinter

Jun 17, 2015 07:00 BST Chalmers University of Technology The circuit in the form of a tree is made up of cellulose, which has been made electronically conductive by means of carbon nanotubes, and printed using the 3D bioprinter at Chalmers University of Technology. Forest commodities provide new, environmentally friendly materials that can be used within the field of additive manufacturing.

CRM Solutions for Businesses

Jun 02, 2015 14:29 BST SenServe Limited