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The four principal investigators behind the quantum computer project

The four principal investigators behind the quantum computer project

Nov 15, 2017 07:40 GMT

Göran Wendin, Per Delsing, Göran Johansson and Jonas Bylander are the four researchers at Chalmers University of Technology who, thanks to the donation from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, will now bring forward Sweden's first quantum computer. This is happening in the context of the newly established Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology. In addition there are two more principal investigators; Gunnar Björk at KTH Royal Institute of Technology will coordinate research in quantum communication, and Stefan Kröll at Lund University will focus on quantum sensing.

Lena Gustafsson, Chairman of the Board of Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology

Lena Gustafsson, Chairman of the Board of Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology

Nov 15, 2017 07:40 GMT

Lena Gustafsson, Professor Emerita in Microbiology and former Vice-chancellor of Umeå University, becomes Chairman of the Board of Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology: "The breadth of potential applications in quantum technology is very big. It is amazing that Sweden can now enter this area on a large scale. We have the skills, and now also the opportunity to really participate in this exciting global development."

Jonas Bylander and colleagues study Chalmers’ first-generation quantum computer

Jonas Bylander and colleagues study Chalmers’ first-generation quantum computer

Nov 15, 2017 07:40 GMT

Associate professor Jonas Bylander and professors Göran Johansson, Göran Wendin and Per Delsing are the principal investigators of the project to develop a quantum computer with at least one hundred qubits within ten years. This is one of the goals of the initiative Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology.

A dust-free clean room is required to work with quantum devices

A dust-free clean room is required to work with quantum devices

Nov 15, 2017 07:40 GMT

Chalmers University of Technology has the experience and necessary infrastructure for experimental work in quantum technology. Their 1000 square meter, well-equipped clean room is one of the world's premier academic environments for advanced nano-level research.

Göran Wendin, Professor of Theoretical Physics at Chalmers University of Technology

Göran Wendin, Professor of Theoretical Physics at Chalmers University of Technology

Nov 15, 2017 07:40 GMT

Göran Wendin, Professor Emeritus in Theoretical Physics, Chalmers, has coordinated the EU’s five previous quantum projects for superconducting circuits. In Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology, he will act as senior advisor and lead the guest research programme: "Big words, of course, but I'm sure this will be a new technology revolution. Quantum technology will become hugely valuable for industry because it opens the door for next generation's artificial intelligence, autonomous vehicles and the Internet of Things."

Stefan Kröll, Professor of Atomic Physics at Lund University

Stefan Kröll, Professor of Atomic Physics at Lund University

Nov 15, 2017 07:40 GMT

Stefan Kröll, Professor of Atomic Physics at Lund University, will lead the field of quantum sensing within Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology: "One vision is that quantum sensors will play a major role in the field of medicine. For example, quantum sensors can be placed in cells and study different processes inside the body, such as in the brain. But completely other uses for quantum sensors can also open up, fields of use which we cannot imagine today."

Gunnar Björk, Professor of Photonics at KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Gunnar Björk, Professor of Photonics at KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Nov 15, 2017 07:40 GMT

Gunnar Björk, Professor of Photonics at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, will be responsible for the quantum excellence programme within Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology: "Digital information which we want to keep secret becomes significantly more secure with quantum communication. Today, communication security is based on a supposed but not proven assumption that certain calculating problems are hard to solve. With quantum communication, we instead build security on the laws of physics, which hopefully gives us much less worries with hacker attacks and ransomware."

Jonas Bylander, Associate Professor at Quantum Device Physics Laboratory at Chalmers University of Technology

Jonas Bylander, Associate Professor at Quantum Device Physics Laboratory at Chalmers University of Technology

Nov 15, 2017 07:40 GMT

Jonas Bylander, Associate Professor at the Quantum Device Physics Laboratory at Chalmers University of Technology, will lead the experimental parts of the Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology, together with Professor Per Delsing. Jonas Bylander has previously worked at MIT in Boston: "At the moment, we are working to characterize our first generation, very small quantum computer built up of three qubits. When we will manage to control a processor with hundred qubits, we will be able to solve really interesting problems that lie out of reach of today's supercomputers."

Per Delsing, Professor of Quantum Device Physics at Chalmers University of Technology

Per Delsing, Professor of Quantum Device Physics at Chalmers University of Technology

Nov 15, 2017 07:40 GMT

Per Delsing, Professor of Quantum Device Physics at Chalmers University of Technology, is Programme Director of Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology: "Certain applications in quantum technology, especially in quantum communications and quantum sensors, are already being commercialized. But it will take a while before we will be able to reap the benefits of a working quantum computer. It's a huge project to build a useful quantum computer, but we have long experience of superconducting circuits and qubits and plenty of ideas on how to tackle the challenges."