Oesqy3mtyvxkhh5pfc46

Most primitive kangaroo ancestor rediscovered after 30 years in obscurity

Press Releases   •   Apr 11, 2018 10:21 BST

A handful of tiny teeth have led scientists to identify the most distant ancestor of today’s kangaroos. The fossils were found in the desert heart of Australia, and then hidden away, and almost forgotten in a museum collection for over three decades. The findings are published in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology.

Giefpyq3qxrdh3qd7k4s

Jane Mansbridge is the 24th laureate of the Johan Skytte Prize in Political Science

Press Releases   •   Apr 06, 2018 06:16 BST

​Jane Mansbridge, Charles F. Adams Professor in Political Leadership and Democratic Values at Harvard University, is awarded the 2018 Johan Skytte Prize in Political Science. Professor Mansbridge wins the prize for “with sharpness, deep involvement and feminist theory having shaped our understanding of democracy in its direct and representative forms.”

Fgt07w4xtv2mkbpwupu1

Study reveals how ‘microbial axolotl’ repairs itself

Press Releases   •   Apr 05, 2018 16:00 BST

In a new study, published in Current Biology this week, a research team from Uppsala University reports new insights into the regenerative capabilities of Stentor, a single celled model organism for regeneration biology. The study used novel gene expression methods that allowed the researchers to identify over one thousand genes involved in the regeneration process of individual stentor cells.

Media no image

The relevance of GABA for diabetes is highlighted in two new studies published in EBioMedicine.

Press Releases   •   Apr 05, 2018 07:00 BST

Dynamic interactions between the nervous system, hormones and the immune system are normally on-going but in diabetes the balance is disturbed. The two studies published in EBioMedicine by an international research team from Uppsala University highlight the importance of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

GABA is synthesized by an enzyme called GAD from the amino acid glutamate in nerve cells but also, importantly, in the insulin-producing beta cells in pancreatic islets. GAD has two forms, GAD65 and GAD67. In type 1 diabetes, beta cells are destroyed while type 2 diabetes is associated with impaired beta cell function and insulin resistance.

Patients with type 1 diabetes often have antibodies to GAD65. However, there has been no strong link between GABA and type 2 diabetes until recently when it was shown that GABA is important for maintaining and potentially also in the making of new beta cells.

The two current studies, now published in EBioMedicine (http://www.ebiomedicine.com), reinforce the image of GABA's importance, for both types of diabetes. The scientists used ion channels that GABA opens, the GABAA receptors, as a biological sensor for GABA, and were able to determine the effective, physiological GABA concentration levels in human pancreatic islets. They also showed that these ion channels became more sensitive to GABA in type 2 diabetes and that GABA helps regulate insulin secretion (Article 1).

The scientists then isolated immune cells from human blood and studied the effects GABA had on these cells. They show that GABA inhibited the cells and reduced the secretion of a large number of inflammatory molecules (Article 2).

The anti-inflammatory effect of GABA may be vital in the pancreatic islets since as long as GABA is present, toxic white blood cells can be inhibited, thus increasing the survival of the insulin-secreting beta cells. When the beta cells decrease in number and disappear from the islets as happens in Type 1 diabetes, then GABA consequently is also decreased and, thereby, the GABA protective shielding of the beta cells. When inflammatory molecules increase in strength, it may weaken and even kill the remaining beta cells.

In ongoing studies, the scientists now focus on clarifying the GABA signaling mechanisms in the immune cells and in the human beta cells. They will also study how existing drugs can increase, decrease or mimic the effects of GABA, says Bryndis Birnir.

Articles:
1. Functional characterization of native, high-affinity GABAA receptors in human pancreatic beta cells (2018). Sergiy V. Korol#, Zhe Jin#, Yang Jin, Amol K. Bhandage, Anders Tengholm, Nikhil R. Gandasi, Sebastian Barg, Daniel Espes, Per-Ola Carlsson, Derek Laver, Bryndis Birnir*,
EBioMedicine https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2018.03.014

2. GABA regulates release of inflammatory cytokines from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD4+ T cells and is immunosuppressive in type 1 diabetes (2018). Amol K. Bhandage, Zhe Jin, Sergiy V. Korol, Qiujin Shen, Yu Pei, Qiaolin Deng, Daniel Espes, Per-Ola Carlsson, Masood Kamali-Moghaddam, Bryndis Birnir*, EBioMedicine https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2018.03.019

For more information, please contact Professor Bryndis Birnir, tel: 018-471-4677, e-post: bryndis.birnir@neuro.uu.se

Uppsala University -- quality, knowledge, and creativity since 1477
World-class research and outstanding education of global benefit to society, business, and culture.
Uppsala University is one of northern Europe's highest ranked academic institutions. www.uu.se

Dynamic interactions between the nervous system, hormones and the immune system are normally on-going but in diabetes the balance is disturbed. The two studies published in EBioMedicine by an international research team from Uppsala University highlight the importance of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

Read more »
Media no image

New insight about how viruses use host proteins to their advantage

Press Releases   •   Apr 02, 2018 20:00 BST

Viruses have a very limited set of genes and therefore must use the cellular machineries of their hosts for most parts of their growth. A new study, led by scientists at Uppsala University, has discovered a specific host protein that many viruses use for their transport within the cell. The discovery opens up new possibilities to develop a broad spectrum anti-viral therapy. 

The paper is published this week in PNAS. With modern DNA sequencing technologies it is relatively easy to identify all genes coding for proteins in an organism but it is often much more challenging to really understand the cellular function of proteins. The human gene ZC3H11A described in the current study has been known for about 20 years but its functional importance has been unknown.

“We have been interested in this gene for several years and finally decided to use gene editing (CRISPR-Cas9) to inactivate the gene in a human cell line,” explains Shady Younis who carried out this research as part of his PhD studies. “However, inactivation of ZC3H11A had little effect showing that this gene is not essential for the growth of these human cells.”

Shady Younis discussed this somewhat disappointing finding during a Department retreat with one of his PhD fellows, Wael Kamel, who did his PhD studies on the biology of adenovirus. This led to a suggestion to try to challenge the cells lacking ZC3H11A with a virus infection. To their surprise it turned out that there was a drastic reduction of the growth of adenovirus in cells lacking ZC3H11A compared with cells expressing this protein. This serendipitous discovery is an excellent example of how a good scientific environment can inspire scientists to collaborative efforts that may lead to important scientific discoveries.

“We have now demonstrated that at least four different viruses, adenovirus, influenza virus, HIV and herpes simplex virus, that all replicate in the host cell nucleus is dependent on the ZC3H11A protein for their efficient growth,” says Wael Kamel. “These viruses need ZC3H11A for the transport of virus RNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where the virus proteins will be produced before the viruses can exit the cell and infect other cells.”

The group has demonstrated that ZC3H11A is a stress-induced RNA binding protein and therefore appears to be part of a previously unknown mechanism how cells handle stress.

“The observation that the amount of ZC3H11A protein increases during a virus infection was a very surprising finding since viruses typically shuts down host cell protein expression to favour virus production,” explains Göran Akusjärvi who led the study together with Leif Andersson at the Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. “Our data suggest that nuclear-replicating viruses have hijacked a cellular mechanism for RNA transport activated during stress for their own advantage.”

The ZC3H11A gene is found in all vertebrates and is expressed essentially in all human cells, so there is no doubt that it has an important function. However, the fact that it does not appear to be critical for cellular growth but for replication of multiple medically important viruses makes it interesting as a target for the development of new broad spectrum anti-viral therapies.

“There is a strong need to develop new anti-viral drugs as is well illustrated by the quite severe influenza we have had this winter,” says Leif Andersson. “A major goal for the team is now to test if they can block how viruses take advantage of the function of the ZC3H11A protein and if this will impair virus growth in living animals, not only in cells as they have proven in the current study.”

Reference: Multiple nuclear-replicating viruses require the stress-induced protein ZC3H11A for efficient growth, PNAS, doi/10.1073/pnas.1722333115

Image legends:
Image 1. Localization of the ZC3H11A protein in human HeLa cells infected with adenovirus. Photo: Shady Younis.

Image 2. The ZC3H11A protein (in green) surrounds the adenovirus replication centers in human in HeLa cells. Photo: Shady Younis.

For more information, contact:

Professor Leif Andersson, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Uppsala University, Texas A&M University, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, e-mail: Leif.Andersson@imbim.uu.se

Professor Göran Akusjärvi, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Uppsala University, phone: +46-70 425 0361, e-mail: Goran.Akusjarvi@imbim.uu.se

Uppsala University -- quality, knowledge, and creativity since 1477
World-class research and outstanding education of global benefit to society, business, and culture.
Uppsala University is one of northern Europe's highest ranked academic institutions. www.uu.se

Viruses have a very limited set of genes and therefore must use the cellular machineries of their hosts for most parts of their growth. A new study, led by scientists at Uppsala University, has discovered a specific host protein that many viruses use for their transport within the cell. The discovery opens up new possibilities to develop a broad spectrum anti-viral therapy.

Read more »
Q5qjgltul0z665pbvvpr

Genetic prehistory of Iberia differs from central and northern Europe

Press Releases   •   Mar 12, 2018 19:00 GMT

In a multidisciplinary study published in PNAS, an international team of researchers combined archaeological, genetic and stable isotope data to encapsulate 4000 years of Iberian biomolecular prehistory.

Zfchcjpyzvbxobhbxgku

Teen gamers have as many friends as non-gamers

Press Releases   •   Mar 07, 2018 13:15 GMT

Young digital gamers do not have fewer friends at school than their non-gamer peers, two new research articles from Uppsala University indicate.

Tg9sdzux9rc0najzjmjc

Desertification and monsoon climate change linked to shifts in ice volume and sea level

Press Releases   •   Mar 07, 2018 11:31 GMT

The East Asian summer monsoon and desertification in Eurasia is driven by fluctuating Northern Hemisphere ice volume and global sea level during the Ice Age, as shown in a study published in Nature Communications.

Media no image

UPDATED: Application process open for Uppsala Health Summit journalist grants for Summit on global cancer care, 14-15 June 2018.

Press Releases   •   Mar 05, 2018 12:45 GMT

Uppsala Health Summit offers four travel grants for journalists to join the summit at Uppsala Castle, Sweden in June on the theme: Care for Cancer.

The grants are offered to enable journalists to develop their understanding of the dilemmas of the cancer care of today and solutions for tomorrow.

Uppsala Health Summit is an annual international arena for frank and challenging dialogue between 200 personally invited decision-makers, opinion builders and experts on how we can use knowledge from research and innovations for better health and healthcare globally. Delegates come from policy making, healthcare, industry, civil society and academia.

Media plays an important role in sharing an informed and nuanced understanding of societal dilemmas and their solutions. Yet too few journalists have the possibility to build in-depth insights of the global health challenges and dilemmas of today. Uppsala Health Summit is an opportunity for journalists who want to meet with a variety of stakeholders with different perspectives on the problem in focus and with broad insights in the health policy agenda, to contribute to constructive debate in society.

Travel grants are offered to four journalists, amounting to approximately 10 000 SEK each (approx. 1 100 EUR), covering costs for travel and accommodation.

The travel grant will be offered without any obligations to report from the Summit, and grantees will be selected by a committee with long-standing experience from science and media relations.

Information on how to apply is available on Uppsala Health Summit’s website (http://www.uppsalahealthsummit.se/press/travel-grants-press/uhs-journalist-grant). Last day for applications is 6 April 2018.

The Summit in June 2018 – Care for Cancer

Today there are more opportunities than ever to survive and even recover from cancer, thanks to scientific breakthroughs and better treatment options. But the growing global incidence and prevalence put high demands on healthcare governance and prioritization. How can we pave the way for more equitable access to diagnosis and treatment? These questions will be at the heart of the discussions at Uppsala Health Summit 2018 on the theme Care for Cancer.

Among the confirmed speakers we find Professor Max Parkin, Nuffield Dept. of Population Health, Oxford University, and Gregory C. Simon J.D., President of the Biden Cancer Initiative, and Dr. Susan Galbraith, Head of Oncology at AstraZeneca, who will discuss the global epidemiologic outlook, and the needs to respond with focused research strategies.

WHO’s Assistant Director General for Drug Access, Vaccines and Pharmaceuticals, Dr. Mariângela Simão, Professor Arnie Purushotham, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai and Thomas B. Cueni, Director General, International Federation of Pharmaceuticals and Associations will join the Summit for a discussion on how to meet the unequal access to diagnostics and treatments globally.

The full program is available here: http://www.uppsalahealthsummit.se/summit-2018/programme-2018/

The Summit takes place at Uppsala Castle, Sweden, located in Uppsala, 30 minutes north of Stockholm Arlanda International Airport.

Uppsala Health Summit is a collaboration led by Uppsala University, including the Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala Region, the Medical Products Agency, the National Veterinary Institute, the National Food Agency, Uppsala Monitoring Centre, the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare – Forte, the Childhood Cancer Foundation, the City of Uppsala and the network Worldclass Uppsala.

Themes of previous summits:
• Healthcare for healthy ageing (2014)
• A world without antibiotics (2015)
• Ending childhood obesity (2016)
• Tackling Infectious Disease Threats – Prevent, Detect, Respond with a One Health Approach (2017)

For more information on travel grants for media, please contact: Anneli Waara, press officer Uppsala University, tel +46 (0)18 471 19 74

For more information on Uppsala Health Summit, please contact:
Madeleine Neil, project manager Uppsala Health Summit, tel +46 (0)18 471 19 37, madeleine.neil@uadm.uu.se


Uppsala Health Summit offers four travel grants for journalists to join the summit at Uppsala Castle, Sweden in June on the theme: Care for Cancer. The grants are offered to enable journalists to develop their understanding of the dilemmas of the cancer care of today and solutions for tomorrow.

Read more »
Media no image

Application process now open for Uppsala Health Summit journalist grants for Summit on global cancer care, 14-15 June 2018.

Press Releases   •   Mar 01, 2018 09:14 GMT

Uppsala Health Summit offers four travel grants for journalists to join the summit at Uppsala Castle, Sweden in June on the theme: Care for Cancer.

The grants are offered to enable journalists to develop their understanding of the dilemmas of the cancer care of today and solutions for tomorrow.

Uppsala Health Summit is an annual international arena for frank and challenging dialogue between 200 personally invited decision-makers, opinion builders and experts on how we can use knowledge from research and innovations for better health and healthcare globally. Delegates come from policy making, healthcare, industry, civil society and academia.

Media plays an important role in sharing an informed and nuanced understanding of societal dilemmas and their solutions. Yet too few journalists have the possibility to build in-depth insights of the global health challenges and dilemmas of today. Uppsala Health Summit is an opportunity for journalists who want to meet with a variety of stakeholders with different perspectives on the problem in focus and with broad insights in the health policy agenda, to contribute to constructive debate in society.

Travel grants are offered to four journalists, amounting to approximately 10 000 SEK each (approx. 1 100 EUR), covering costs for travel and accommodation.

The travel grant will be offered without any obligations to report from the Summit, and grantees will be selected by a committee with long-standing experience from science and media relations.

Information on how to apply is available on Uppsala Health Summit’s website (http://www.uppsalahealthsummit.se/contact-us/press-travel-grants/). Last day for applications is 18 March 2018.

The Summit in June 2018 – Care for Cancer

Today there are more opportunities than ever to survive and even recover from cancer, thanks to scientific breakthroughs and better treatment options. But the growing global incidence and prevalence put high demands on healthcare governance and prioritization. How can we pave the way for more equitable access to diagnosis and treatment? These questions will be at the heart of the discussions at Uppsala Health Summit 2018 on the theme Care for Cancer.

Among the confirmed speakers we find Professor Max Parkin, Nuffield Dept. of Population Health, Oxford University, and Gregory C. Simon J.D., President of the Biden Cancer Initiative, and Dr. Susan Galbraith, Head of Oncology at AstraZeneca, who will discuss the global epidemiologic outlook, and the needs to respond with focused research strategies.

WHO’s Assistant Director General for Drug Access, Vaccines and Pharmaceuticals, Dr. Mariângela Simão, Professor Arnie Purushotham, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai and Thomas B. Cueni, Director General, International Federation of Pharmaceuticals and Associations will join the Summit for a discussion on how to meet the unequal access to diagnostics and treatments globally.

The full program is available here: http://www.uppsalahealthsummit.se/summit-2018/programme-2018/

The Summit takes place at Uppsala Castle, Sweden, located in Uppsala, 30 minutes north of Stockholm Arlanda International Airport.

Uppsala Health Summit is a collaboration led by Uppsala University, including the Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala Region, the Medical Products Agency, the National Veterinary Institute, the National Food Agency, Uppsala Monitoring Centre, the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare – Forte, the Childhood Cancer Foundation, the City of Uppsala and the network Worldclass Uppsala.

Themes of previous summits:
• Healthcare for healthy ageing (2014)
• A world without antibiotics (2015)
• Ending childhood obesity (2016)
• Tackling Infectious Disease Threats – Prevent, Detect, Respond with a One Health Approach (2017)

For more information on travel grants for media, please contact: Anneli Waara, press secretary Uppsala University, tel +46 (0)18 471 19 74

For more information on Uppsala Health Summit, please contact:
Madeleine Neil, project manager Uppsala Health Summit, tel +46 (0)18 471 19 37, madeleine.neil@uadm.uu.se


Uppsala Health Summit offers four travel grants for journalists to join the summit at Uppsala Castle, Sweden, in June on the theme: Care for Cancer.

Read more »

Contacts 8 contacts

  • Press Contact
  • Press Officer
  • uveldbin.backstromqw@uxflvadajlhxfm.uupyap.se
  • +46 18 471 17 06
  • +46 70 425 09 83

  • Press Contact
  • Press Officer
  • linda.koffmar@uadm.uu.se
  • +46 (0)18-471 19 59
  • +46 (0)70-425 08 64

  • Press Contact
  • Senior Press Officer
  • anneli.waara@uadm.uu.se
  • +46 (0)18-471 1974
  • +46 (0)70-425 0718

About Uppsala University

Uppsala University -- quality, knowledge, and creativity since 1477

World-class research and outstanding education of global benefit to society, business, and culture.
Uppsala University is one of northern Europe's highest ranked academic institutions. www.uu.se

Address

  • Uppsala University
  • S:t Olofsgatan 10B, Box 256
  • 751 05 Uppsala
  • Our homepage