Mershona Parshall

Mershona Parshall

Blog post   •   Sep 28, 2010 07:55 EDT

Ms.Mershona Parshall Family Therapy

SECONDARY DEVELOPMENTAL TRAUMA: PHYSICAL, EMOTIONAL AND SEXUAL ABUSE
Secondary developmental trauma often co-occurs with failures in attachment. The infant who is pre-verbal or the young child who is helpless to protect him/herself is left with a storm of confused feelings and thoughts about the world. Living in chronic states of danger imposes two survival based patterns in the child. At one end of the spectrum is hyper-arousal associated with flight/flight and at the other end of the spectrum is hypo-arousal, freezing and dissociation. Sometimes unseen insults such as traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to physical abuse or fetal alcohol effects go unrecognized and reduce the child’s ability to function. The psycho-social-biological effects of secondary trauma reinforce any failure in attachment, complicating the over all picture. Often these children come with a long list of diagnoses, none of which fully capture the complexity of issues of children who have experienced multiple traumas in their young lives.

Neurofeedback for Personal Growth and Transformation

Neurofeedback is a powerful tool to shift trainees out of unhelpful patterns into more authentic ways of being. Neurofeedback trainees typically experience:

* A melting away of symptoms that were once bothersome or disturbing;
* A shift away from old thinking patterns, as old perceptions become less relevant;
* A greater sense of well being, confidence, and calm.

Neurofeedback may be combined with psychotherapy to support the trainee's personal growth and healing.

Mershona Parshall Grief And Loss Issues :Rather than depending on caring adults to provide warmth and safety, a survival driven child is motivated to get his or her needs met in ways that exclude relationships. Such children are often highly dys-regulated and attempt to manage internal fear states by exerting an inordinate amount of control onto their environment. This behavior may be viewed as a child’s natural reaction to survival stress as the world is perceived as unsafe and uncaring.
Attachment trauma is not always due to maltreatment. Failures in attachment may also be situational, such as an infant who is medically fragile and is hospitalized in his or her first months of life. In addition, there are always additional factors that bear on a child’s attachment resources. These include genetic factors, natural resilience, temperament, and mitigating buffers that may offer some protection against the detrimental effects of attachment trauma. An example of a buffer may be a loving grandparent.

Mershona Parshall Attachment And Bonding Therapy

ATTACHMENT & BONDING THERAPY

ATTACHMENT SERVICES OFFERED FOR FOSTER AND ADOPTIVE FAMILIES

ASSESSMENT
The assessment determines a diagnosis and treatment recommendations. There are two parts to an assessment. First a meeting with the parents or primary caregiver is necessary to review the child’s history, family dynamics, family functioning and the child’s present functioning. A subsequent meeting with the child and parents completes the initial assessment process.Following the assessment, treatment recommendations are provided the parents. Typically, once weekly or twice weekly sessions are recommended depending on the intensity level needed for optimal treatment outcomes.

PARENT COACHING AND CONSULTATION
Available to those who live at a distance and who may want to consult with an experienced attachment and neurofeedback therapist.

Mershona Parshall Info :1. Biological Synchrony/Affective Attunement refers to the primary caregiver’s ability to attune to the infant’s somatic and affective needs. This attunement between mother and infant/child builds the neural connections that are the infrastructure for relationships. Additionally, the infant’s nervous system develops the capacity to self regulate through the mother’s facilitation of the distress/comfort/calm cycle.
2. Secure Base – A secure base is the infant/child’s internal sense of security. The parent facilitates an infant/child’s secure base by being consistently and predictably responsive to his/her physical, sensory, and emotional needs. This predictability provides the infant/child with the security to develop natural curiosity resulting in the confidence to then explore his or her environment.
3. Internal Working Model – Over time the infant/child develops a template or internal representation of him/herself in relationship to others. Repetitive interactions between infant/child and caregiver will create the neurophysiologic template that becomes the child’s internalized model for relationships.
4. Selective Bonding - According to Bowlby, the infant/child prefers and seeks closeness to his/her mother above all. From an evolutionary biology perspective, this proximity seeking behavior was thought to insure the safety of the young from predators.

Ms.Mershona Parshall Contact LOSS, SEPARATION, GRIEF AND ATTACHMENT
When children are placed in foster care, institutions, or are adopted, they not only lose their birth parent(s), they lose siblings and extended family members as well. Infants and children who experience early loss often carry deep emotional pain and unresolved grief associated with a childhood lost.
Bowlby described a sequence of grief reactions that he observed in infants/children who experienced prolonged separation from primary attachment figures. These stages are also applicable to children who have experienced multiple separations in their young lives. The first stage he called protest. In this stage the child cries, kicks, or screams in order to get the primary attachment figure to return in order to regain close proximity. If the protest does not produce the return of the attachment figure, then the infant/child begins to despair in the second stage. Despair is expressed as withdrawal and apathy in the child, sometimes misinterpreted as acceptance by unknowing adults. If the condition of loss of the attachment figure persists, the infant/child detaches or de-invests from relationships. Detachment is a protective measure that a child assumes against the psychic pain of the loss. Permanent detachment may occur if the grieving process persists unresolved. In this final stage the child divests his or her loving feeling from any attachment figure and invests this into his/herself, no longer considering relationships necessary for needs fulfillment.

Ms.Mershona Parshall Family Therapy ATTACHMENT & BONDING THERAPY

ATTACHMENT SERVICES OFFERED FOR FOSTER AND ADOPTIVE FAMILIES

ASSESSMENT
The assessment determines a diagnosis and treatment recommendations. There are two parts to an assessment. First a meeting with the parents or primary caregiver is necessary to review the child’s history, family dynamics, family functioning and the child’s present functioning. A subsequent meeting with the child and parents completes the initial assessment process.Following the assessment, treatment recommendations are provided the parents. Typically, once weekly or twice weekly sessions are recommended depending on the intensity level needed for optimal treatment outcomes.

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