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Clinical Revolution: Working With CCGs in the New Primary Care Landscape

Press Release   •   Oct 27, 2016 06:42 EDT

MarketResearchReports.biz has recently announced the addition of a market study “ Clinical Revolution: Working With CCGs in the New Primary Care Landscape ”, is a comparative analysis of the global market.

Product Synopsis

This changing landscape is being geared to generate greater efficiencies of scale against the backdrop of flat budgets and more clinical calls on an already stretched health and social care system.

90% of NHS patient contacts are at primary care level. Kable estimates that this market will grow to 676m in 2013/14, peaking at 894m in 2014/15, before dropping back to 753m in 2016/17.

As of April 1st, the 211 newly established Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG) will form the backbone of the primary health care market, responsible for commissioning clinical and other support services for England's 8,371 GP practices.

Kable has been tracking CCGs since their inception in 2011. This report updates CCGs' attitudes to ICT procurement, and discusses their evolving relationships with Commissioning Support Units.

Introduction and Landscape

The radical NHS organisational structure coming into force means the ICT procurement routes within primary health care will present new opportunities for vendors primed to respond to changing operational models and so engage meaningfully with key influencers.

Key Features and Benefits

Kable covers the use of ICT in the public sector across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Key Market Issues

Gain insight into the changing landscape of the UK healthcare market.

Gain insight into the opportunity landscape.

Gain insight into outsourcing.

Key Highlights

The 211 Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG) are the key element in the new organisational structure that will be responsible, from 1 April 2013, for organising the primary health care market. They are currently operating in shadow mode but when they assume their full powers, they will be responsible for commissioning clinical and other support services for England's 8,371 GP practices.

Download The sample Copy Of This Report: http://www.marketresearchreports.biz/sample/sample/176905

CCGs have been recruiting staff, drawing up plans, putting systems into place and achieving authorisation to operate (All must achieve this status by 1 April). Their indicative running cost allowances were fixed by the National Health Service Commissioning Board (NHS CB) in May 2012. Budgets for 2013/2014 were announced in December 2012. All existing contracts should have been transitioned across to the NHS CB or CCGs by the end of 2012. It is not clear if this timetable has been met.

In the NHS, 90% of patient contacts are at primary care level. Kable estimates that this market will grow from 586m in 2012/13 to 676m in 2013/14. It will peak at 894m in 2014/15 before dropping back to 753m in 2016/17. CCGs give access to this market.

Table Of Content

1 Overview

1.1 Why Clinical Commissioning Groups are important to ICT vendors

1.2 CCGs are key gatekeepers to the primary health care ICT market

1.3 Responsibilities of the NHS Commissioning Board

1.4 General practitioner IT services and CCGs

1.5 Role and responsibilities of the Commissioning Support Units

1.6 CSUs seen by CCGs as a source of ICT services

1.7 CCGs want to commission others to deliver ICT services

1.8 ICT purchase via CCGs or CSUs may drive standardisation in GP practices.

1.9 Outsourcing and shared services

1.10 Opportunity landscape

1.11 Telehealth/telecare - important strategic objective but low investment potential?

1.12 Application readiness

1.13 CCG spending power

1.14 CCG back-office ICT

2 Political requirements

2.1 A paperless NHS by 2018

2.2 First NHS Mandate

3 GP Systems of Choice

3.1 Preliminaries to re-procurement

4 What suppliers should do

4.1 All ICT vendors

4.2 Vendor selection criteria

4.3 IT and business process outsourcers

4.4 Systems integrators

4.5 Voice and data communication providers

4.6 Software vendors

5 Strategic objectives

6 Trends

7 Opportunity landscape

7.1 Opportunity landscape in the coming twelve months

7.2 Opportunity landscape in the coming three years

8 Outsourcing

8.1 Likelihood to outsource

8.2 Types of processes considered for outsourcing

8.3 Specifics of outsourcing plans

9 Shared services

9.1 Likelihood to share services

9.2 Likelihood of leading a shared services

9.3 Types of services that could be shared

10 Application readiness

10.1 Current and future implementation levels