New mechanism for dysfunctional insulin release identified

Press releases   •   Sep 19, 2019 08:44 BST

In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University have identified a previously unknown mechanism that regulates release of insulin, a hormone that lowers blood glucose levels, from the β-cells (beta cells) of the pancreas. This mechanism is disrupted in type 2 diabetes. The scientists hope this finding will be used to develop new treatments against the disease.

Globally, more than 400 million people suffer from type 2 diabetes. One of the main problems is inadequate secretion, from the β-cells of the pancreas, of insulin hormone, which lowers blood sugar (blood glucose).

It has been known for some time that impaired insulin secretion is due to an inability of the insulin-containing secretory granules attach themselves (‘dock’) to, and then fuse with, the cell membrane. As a result, less insulin reaches the blood and, accordingly, the body becomes less able to reduce blood glucose levels sufficiently.

In the new study, the scientists identify a protein, Sac2, that is found at lower levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. In experiments, the researchers show that lowering the levels of this protein by experimental means leads to reduced insulin secretion from the β-cells. By using advanced microscopy techniques, the researchers were able to show that Sac2 is an important component on the surface of the insulin-containing secretory granules, where it modifies the fat composition of the membrane. In the absence of Sac2, a specific fat molecule accumulates on the surface of the secretory granules. This incapacitates them, so that they cannot dock to the cell membrane, which in turn causes insulin secretion to be reduced.

This study shows, first and foremost, that reduced levels of a single protein gives rise to β-cells that exhibit several defects associated with type 2 diabetes. But it also shows that the fat composition of the insulin-containing secretory granules is of importance for their ability to be released from the cells. The scientists now hope that it will be possible to use these findings to develop new ways of treating type 2 diabetes.

For more information, contact Olof Idevall, researcher at the Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, tel. +46-(0)76 3940079, email Olof.Idevall@mcb.uu.se

Phuoc My Nguyen, Nikhil R. Gandasi, Beichen Xie, Sari Sugahara, Yingke Xu, and Olof Idevall-Hagren (2019): The PI(4)P phosphatase Sac2 controls insulin granule docking and release. Journal of Cell Biology, DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201903121

Uppsala University -- quality, knowledge, and creativity since 1477
World-class research and outstanding education of global benefit to society, business, and culture.
Uppsala University is one of northern Europe's highest ranked academic institutions. www.uu.se

In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University have identified a previously unknown mechanism that regulates release of insulin, a hormone that lowers blood glucose levels, from the β-cells (beta cells) of the pancreas. This mechanism is disrupted in type 2 diabetes. The scientists hope this finding will be used to develop new treatments against the disease.

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​One step closer future to quantum computers

Press releases   •   Sep 16, 2019 15:12 BST

Physicists at Uppsala University have identified how to distinguish between true and ‘fake’ Majorana states in one of the most commonly used experimental setups, by means of supercurrent measurements. This theoretical study is a crucial step for advancing the field of topological superconductors and applications of Majorana states for robust quantum computers. New experiments testing this approach are expected next.

Majorana states exist as zero-energy states at the ends of topological superconductors (a special type of superconductors, materials that conduct with zero resistance when cooled close to absolute zero temperature), where low-energy states are robust against defects. Majorana states have exotic properties that make them promising candidates as qubits for fault-tolerant quantum computers. However, in experiments trivial zero-energy states mimicking Majorana states can also appear. The difficulty in telling apart the true and these ‘fake’ Majoranas is a problem that has hampered the experimental progress in this field of research and has been a thorn in the side of experts.

A solution to this problem has been proposed in a recent study by Annica Black-Schaffer’s group. The authors simulated the entire system of one of the most common experimental setups used in engineering topological superconductors as accurately as possible and captured the main effects of all the components. By investigating the supercurrent (the current in superconductors) between two engineered superconductors, they found that there is a sign reversal in the supercurrent due to the trivial ‘fake’ Majorana state under magnetic field application, whereas such sign reversal is not produced by true Majorana states. They then concluded that supercurrents offer a powerful tool for the unambiguous distinction between trivial states and topological Majorana states.

"This study helps and motivates experimentalists towards the proper identification of topological Majoranas by using supercurrent measurements. Our study shows that we need to carry out more exact modelling,” says Jorge Cayao, postdoctoral researcher at Uppsala University.

"It is crucial that we are certain that we have actually engineered Majorana states and not some trivial states. This study presents a way to accomplish that through supercurrent measurements,” says Oladunjoye Awoga, PhD student at Uppsala University.

Oladunjoye A. Awoga, Jorge Cayao, Annica M. Black-Schaffer: Supercurrent Detection of Topologically Trivial Zero-Energy States in Nanowire Junctions; Physical Review Letters; Phys. Rev. Lett. 123, 117001 – Published 12 September 2019, https://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.123.117001, https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.123.117001,

For more information:

Annica Black-Schaffer, Professor at Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Sweden, annica.black-schaffer@physics.uu.se, +46-(0) 76-795 06 49

Jorge Cayao, post doc at Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Sweden, jorge.cayao@physics.uu.se, +46 (0)76-555 04 83

Annica Black-Schaffer's group: http://materials-theory.physics.uu.se/blackschaffer/

Uppsala University -- quality, knowledge, and creativity since 1477
World-class research and outstanding education of global benefit to society, business, and culture.
Uppsala University is one of northern Europe's highest ranked academic institutions. www.uu.se

Physicists at Uppsala University have identified how to distinguish between true and ‘fake’ Majorana states in one of the most commonly used experimental setups, by means of supercurrent measurements. This theoretical study is a crucial step for advancing the field of topological superconductors and applications of Majorana states for robust quantum computers. New experiments are expected next.

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Deaths halved among infarct patients attending Heart School

Press releases   •   Sep 16, 2019 12:59 BST

Patients who attend ‘Heart School’, as almost every patient in Sweden is invited to do after a first heart attack, live longer than non-participating patients. This is shown in a new study, by researchers at Uppsala University, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

Patient education is an important aspect of rehabilitation after a heart attack (myocardial infarction). Core components of Sweden’s ‘Heart School’ are individual counselling and group sessions focused on lifestyle-related, modifiable risks. Thus, patients are taught the importance of maintaining a healthy diet, being physically active and giving up smoking. Almost all patients with a first-time myocardial infarction are invited to participate. However, Heart School attendance is voluntary and fewer than half the patients choose to join.

This study represents the first scientific evaluation of Heart School in relation to mortality after myocardial infarction. To investigate the relationship between Heart School participation and how long patients survive after a first heart attack, the researchers used ten years’ data from the nationwide Swedish heart registry SWEDEHEART (Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies) and the Swedish Cause of Death Register. Socioeconomic variables were obtained from Statistics Sweden (SCB).

The researchers’ material comprised 47,907 patients who had their first heart attack in 2006–2015 and subsequently went to the first CR follow-up visit. Among them, time to total death (from all causes) and death from cardiovascular causes within two and five years after the attack were investigated. The data enabled the scientists to control for a range of other important confounding variables, such as demographic and socioeconomic factors, and other aspects of the patients’ cardiac health.

After adjusting for confounding variables, the researchers found that attendance at Heart School was associated with a markedly lower risk (time to outcome) not only for total mortality, but also for cardiovascular mortality. With up to two years’ follow-up, the Heart School participants’ risk of dying was reduced by 47% (50% risk reduction for death from cardiovascular causes). After up to five years, the follow-up results showed a 38% lower mortality risk (43% lower for death from cardiovascular causes).

“We can say that Heart School attendance was associated with almost halved mortality, both total and specifically cardiovascular, after a first myocardial infarction,” says John Wallert, licensed psychologist and doctoral student at the Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University.

The results were consistent across several sensitivity analyses, including varying dates of Heart School attendance and supplementary checks for participation in other cardiac rehabilitation programmes, among patients who also succeeded in achieving complete cardiac rehabilitation, after gender and age stratification etc.

“We were a little surprised at how robust the results were. In this study, thanks to Sweden’s exceptional registry data, we have the means of controlling for not only clinical and demographic factors, but also factors related to self-selection and socioeconomic variables, such educational attainment and income. Data also provided the statistical power to achieve precise estimates and to allow for a range of sensitivity analyses

“Now we want to determine whether the association of attending Heart School with mortality is genuinely one of cause and effect. Ideally, we’ll find this out in a large enough randomised clinical trial, preferably a registry-based one,” Wallert says.


For more information, contact John Wallert, john.wallert@kbh.uu.se, tel. +46 729 999 217.

Wallert, Olsson, Pingel, Norlund, Leosdottir, Burell, Held (2019), Attending Heart School and long-term outcome after myocardial infarction: A decennial SWEDEHEART registry study, European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, DOI: 10.1177/2047487319871714.

Uppsala University -- quality, knowledge, and creativity since 1477
World-class research and outstanding education of global benefit to society, business, and culture.
Uppsala University is one of northern Europe's highest ranked academic institutions. www.uu.se

​Patients who attend ‘Heart School’, as almost every patient is invited to do after a first heart attack, live longer than non-participating patients. This is shown in a new study, by researchers at Uppsala University, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

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Children’s unique urban health challenges timely topic at Uppsala Health Summit 2019

Press releases   •   Sep 10, 2019 08:36 BST

Densification of cities causes increased traffic and less space for playgrounds, schoolyards and spontaneous play. This has a negative effect on children’s health and development. Even though the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child has been ratified by most countries, the child perspective is often missing in the planning process. The high-level international meeting Uppsala Health Summit is focusing on urban planning from a child health perspective.

Uppsala Health Summit, “Healthy Urban childhoods,” which takes place on October 8th and 9th at Uppsala castle in Uppsala, Sweden, will bring together researchers, representatives from the private sector, health care, international organisations, and civil society organisations from around the world. The purpose of the summit is to develop concrete action plans as a way to develop more child-friendly cities in Sweden as well as internationally.

“By 2050, the majority of the world’s children will live in cities. From the child’s perspective, urban environments should be safe, challenging and accessible, where they can move around on their terms. It should be obvious that we build cities that work for all phases of a person’s life, but sadly, that is not the case. Developers, politicians and planners do not always have children’s best interest in mind. Densification at all costs is a significant trend in today’s city planning and building,” says Petter Åkerblom, Senior Lecturer in Landscape Architecture, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, and Program Committee Chair, Uppsala Health Summit.

The focus of the summit will be on children and urban planning, with a perspective that a city that is planned for children will benefit everyone, and be socially and environmentally sustainable. The discussions during the summit will mostly take place in workshops, which will cover critical topics, including the need for indicators for children’s built environments, children’s participation in building and planning processes, mechanisms to collaborate to reduce child obesity at local levels, city gardening and farms for learning and well-being, and how to measure segregation and child health.

”Cities all over the world are mostly failing children from a child rights perspective, and we have to ensure that all stakeholders including children, adolescents, local communities and CSOs get an opportunity to participate alongside urban planners, and government agencies. Over 1 billion people globally are living in slums and informal settlements, where children are at a further disadvantage due to the inadequacies in their physical and social environments. Ensuring the child’s right to play by making available space, time, resources and permission to play in public places will help to fulfil SDG target #11.7 and is essential for creating safe, inclusive, sustainable and resilient cities, everywhere,” says Sudeshna Chatterjee, CEO of Action for Children’s Environments, India, and speaker at the summit.

Speakers at the summit include Roger Madelin, Head of Canada Water Development, British Land, Dr Fiona Bull, WHO’s expert on child’s physical activity, Professor Mariana Brussoni, the University of British Columbia in Canada, where she researches children and risk-taking, and Sudeshna Chatterjee, urban planner and child rights activist, India.

The summit’s pre-conference report Healthy Urban Childhoods is available on-line.

The meeting is a collaborative effort between Uppsala University, the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala County Council, the City of Uppsala, the Swedish Medical Products Agency, the National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala Monitoring Centre, the network World Class Uppsala, and the Swedish School of Sports and Health Sciences.

For more information, contact Programme Committee Chair Petter Åkerblom, +46(0)706031660, or at Petter.Akerblom@slu.se, or contact Programme Coordinator Kerstin Stewart, +46 (0)704250138, or at kerstin.stewart@uadm.uu.se.

For press attendance and other questions, contact Senior Press Officer Anneli Waara, +46 (0)70-425 0718, or at anneli.waara@uadm.uu.se


Densification of cities causes less space for spontaneous play leading to negative effects on children’s health. Even though the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child has been ratified by most countries, the child perspective is often missing in the planning process. The high-level international meeting Uppsala Health Summit is focusing on urban planning from a child health perspective.

Read more »

Women’s deep belly fat more strongly linked to diabetes and cardiovascular diseases

Press releases   •   Sep 09, 2019 16:00 BST

A comprehensive study from Uppsala University, with over 325,000 participants, shows that deep belly fat is a major contributing risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The study also shows that deep belly fat is a larger risk factor in women compared to men. Moreover, the scientists investigated how our genes affect the accumulation of fat and present a new, simpler method to estimate the amount of deep belly fat.

Visceral fat – fat stored around the organs in the belly and around the intestines – is known to be associated with a higher risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In the new study, published in Nature Medicine, the scientists took it one step further and showed, using genetic data, that there is an actual causal relationship between visceral fat and increased risk of diabetes, heart attack, hypertension and hyperlipidemia.

The scientists developed a method to more easily estimate visceral fat content. The method is not only useful for research purposes, but may also be useful in health care.

“To measure the amount of visceral fat, advanced and costly diagnostic imaging techniques are required. We have developed a simple method which instead estimates an individual’s amount of deep belly fat from other parameters, more easily measured than the visceral fat itself, and the method can therefore be used in most clinics,” says Dr. Torgny Karlsson, statistician at the Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, and one of the leading researchers of the study.

The method also enabled the researchers to study the effects of visceral fat on a much larger scale than before.

“We were surprised that visceral fat was more strongly linked to risk of disease in women compared to men,” says one of the co-authors, Dr. Åsa Johansson, associate professor of molecular epidemiology at the Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University.

“Adding an extra kilogram of visceral fat can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes more than seven times in women, while the same amount of fat accumulation only increases the risk a little more than two times in men,” says Dr. Johansson.

The scientists also found that the risk of disease increases most rapidly in people with small or moderate amounts of deep belly fat, but that it does not increase nearly as much if a person with large amounts of fat in the abdomen puts on additional fat.

“Nonlinear effects like this are very interesting to study and may help us to understand the biology behind the link between visceral fat and disease,” says Dr. Karlsson.

The scientists also examined millions of positions in the genome to identify genes that affect the amount of visceral fat, and found more than two hundred different genes. Among these, there was a large proportion of genes that are linked to our behaviour, which suggests that the main contributor to abdominal obesity is, after all, that we eat too much and exercise too little. However, there are individual differences in how the fat is distributed in the body, and a person who appears not to be overweight may still have accumulated a harmful amount of visceral fat.

“The findings of this study may enable us to simplify measurements of visceral fat, and thus more easily identify people at high risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease,” says Dr. Karlsson.

For more information, contact Åsa Johansson, email: asa.johansson@igp.uu.se, tel: + 46 70-251 3132 or Torgny Karlsson, email: torgny.karlsson@igp.uu.se, tel: + 46 18-471-4806.

Torgny Karlsson, Mathias Rask-Andersen, Gang Pan, Julia Höglund, Claes Wadelius,
Weronica E. Ek and Åsa Johansson (2019) Contribution of genetics to visceral adiposity and its relation to cardiovascular and metabolic disease, Nature Medicine, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0563-7

Uppsala University -- quality, knowledge, and creativity since 1477
World-class research and outstanding education of global benefit to society, business, and culture.
Uppsala University is one of northern Europe's highest ranked academic institutions. www.uu.se

A comprehensive study from Uppsala University, with over 325,000 participants, shows that deep belly fat is a major contributing risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The study also shows that deep belly fat is a larger risk factor in women compared to men.

Read more »

New WHO autoantibody reference reagent will benefit SLE patients

Press releases   •   Sep 05, 2019 09:00 BST

Reference reagents are important in diagnostics and care of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In a new study, an international team of researchers presents a new WHO autoantibody reference reagent that will help to align autoantibody analyses and thus to optimise diagnosis and treatment to patients irrespective of where they live. The findings are published in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic rheumatic disease mainly affecting women in childbearing age that is associated with inflammatory symptoms from multiple organs. Sometimes there are mild symptoms from the skin and joints and sometimes more severe symptoms from the kidneys and the central nervous system. SLE is a truly autoimmune disease where the tolerance against the body’s own structures has been lost, with the appearance of antibodies against the body’s own structure, so called autoantibodies. An important laboratory characteristic of SLE is the appearance of autoantibodies against a multitude of components in nuclei of living cells, so called anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA).

The genetic information in the nuclei of living cells is encoded by deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) that forms a spiral consisting of two DNA strands which are intertwined. Autoantibodies against such double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) is an important group of ANA strongly associated with the diagnosis of SLE: it is uncommon to find anti-dsDNA in patients with diseases other than SLE or in healthy individuals. The occurrence of anti-dsDNA is not only associated with SLE diagnosis, as anti-dsDNA levels increase when SLE disease activity increases, and especially with the occurrence of the serious kidney symptoms (SLE nephritis). Occurrence of anti-dsDNA autoantibodies are thus important both for SLE diagnosis and for the prognosis of SLE. Compared to other laboratory autoantibody analyses, anti-dsDNA is difficult to measure, as different methods detect different subgroups of anti-dsDNA.

Harmonisation of laboratory analyses is important to allow the physicians to compare laboratory analysis results performed in different laboratories/hospitals and thus to optimise diagnosis and treatment to patients irrespective of where they live. Laboratory reference reagents are important in this context. In 1985, the World Health Organization (WHO) endorsed an anti-dsDNA reference reagent that has been used to align anti-dsDNA analyses in different laboratories as well as commercial anti-dsDNA antibody tests provided by different companies. That first WHO reference reagent was exhausted more than ten years ago.

“In our article we describe the development and characterisation of a new anti-dsDNA reference reagent,” says Professor Johan Rönnelid at Uppsala University, last author of the study.

A suitable patient sample available in large amount was identified by the work of 42 European laboratories in the European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) autoantibody study group. This patient sample (2.4 litres) was thereafter transferred to 4300 ampoules, and freeze-dried (lyophilized) to allow for long-term storage, at the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC) in the United Kingdom. This preparation denoted 15/174 was thereafter evaluated in an international study including 36 laboratories from 17 countries worldwide.

“This international evaluation showed that although the performance of 15/174 was not perfect, the current situation with large differences between different anti-dsDNA assays would be improved by use of 15/174 as a reference reagent,” says Johan Rönnelid.

15/174 was endorsed as a WHO reference reagent for anti-dsDNA autoantibodies in November 2017.

“Standardisation of autoantibody analyses is much more complex and difficult than standardisation of chemistry analytes like e.g. blood levels of glucose (sugar), and we cannot expect to obtain the same level of agreement for clinical autoantibody analyses as for simple clinical chemistry analyses. Anyhow, our international validation showed that by using 15/174 as a common reference reagent, differences between different anti-dsDNA assays improved,” says Bernard J Fox, senior scientist and study director at the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC).

“Our intention is that the WHO reference reagent 15/174 will be used to align different test methods for anti-dsDNA antibodies and thus improve the diagnostics and care of patients with SLE,” says Bernard J Fox.

The new WHO reference reagent 15/174 is available from NIBSC for all companies developing anti-dsDNA assays and for clinical immunology laboratories worldwide.

Reference: Fox BJ, Hockley J, Rigsby P, et al. Ann Rheum Dis Epub ahead of print, doi:10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-215845

Contact technical questions:
Bernard J Fox (first author) +44 (0) 7747 616111, email: Bernard.Fox@nibsc.org
BSc (Hons), senior scientist and study director at the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC), Potters Bar, United Kingdom. Responsible for the manufacturing of 15/174 as a candidate standard, and for the international collaborative study validating 15/174.

Contact clinical questions:
Johan Rönnelid (last author) +46 (0)70 3379416, johan.ronnelid@igp.uu.se, MD PhD, professor and senior consultant in clinical immunology at Uppsala University/Uppsala University Hospital. Chairman of the European Leagues against Rheumatism (EULAR) autoantibody study group performing the characterisation of the patient sample used to make the new WHO reference reagent.

Uppsala University -- quality, knowledge, and creativity since 1477
World-class research and outstanding education of global benefit to society, business, and culture.
Uppsala University is one of northern Europe's highest ranked academic institutions. www.uu.se

Reference reagents are important in diagnostics and care of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An international team of researchers now presents a WHO autoantibody reference reagent that will help to align autoantibody analyses and thus to optimise diagnosis and treatment to patients irrespective of where they live. The findings are published in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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The genealogy of important broiler ancestor revealed

Press releases   •   Aug 28, 2019 07:30 BST

A new study examines the historical and genetic origins of the White Plymouth Rock chicken, an important contributor to today’s meat chickens (broilers). Researchers at Uppsala University in Sweden, The Livestock Conservancy and Virginia Tech in the USA have used genomics to study breed formation and the roots of modern broilers.

​How the herring adapted to the light environment in the Baltic Sea

Press releases   •   Aug 26, 2019 20:00 BST

A single amino acid change in the light-sensing rhodopsin protein played a critical role when herring adapted to the red-shifted light environment in the Baltic Sea, shows an study by an international team of scientists, led by researchers from Uppsala University, which is published in PNAS. Remarkably about one third of all fish living in brackish or freshwater carry the same change.

Filter-feeding pterosaurs were the flamingoes of the Late Jurassic

Press releases   •   Aug 26, 2019 12:00 BST

Modern flamingoes employ filter feeding and their feces are, as a result, rich in remains of microscopically-small aquatic prey. Very similar contents are described from more than 150 million year old pterosaur droppings in a recent paper in PeerJ. This represents the first direct evidence of filter-feeding in Late Jurassic pterosaurs.

Novel method identifies the right individual exosomes

Press releases   •   Aug 26, 2019 10:00 BST

There is a growing demand for diagnostic markers for early disease detection and prognosis. Exosomes are potential biomarkers for cancer progression and neurodegenerative disease but it can be difficult to identify what tissue a specific exosome comes from. Researchers at Uppsala University and spin-off company Vesicode AB have solved this problem by developing a method that maps surface protein complements on large numbers of individual exosomes.

Exosomes are released from all cells in the body. They convey protein and nucleic acid cargos between the cells as a form of intercellular communication, and they represent potential circulating biomarkers for tumor progression and metastasis, as well as for early detection of neurodegenerative disease.

In order to use exosomes as biomarkers of diseases in different tissues it is vital to distinguish them according to their surface protein complements. Researchers at Uppsala University and Vesicode AB, along with collaborators, have developed a method that can map surface protein complements on large numbers of individual exosomes.

The novel proximity-dependent barcoding assay (PBA) reveals the surface protein composition of individual exosomes using antibody-DNA conjugates and next-generation sequencing. The method identifies proteins on individual exosomes using micrometer-sized, uniquely tagged single-stranded DNA clusters generated by rolling circle amplification.

“This technology will not only benefit researchers studying exosomes, but also enable high-throughput biomarker discovery. We will further develop and validate the PBA technology and provide service to researchers starting later this year. We believe single exosome analysis will allow this exciting class of biomarkers to reach its full potential,” says Di Wu, researcher and inventor of the PBA technology and founder of Vesicode AB, commercializing the technique.

“This new technology will allow large-scale screens for biomarkers in disease, complementing a panel of methods for sensitive and specific detection of exosomes that we have previously established,” says Masood Kamali-Moghaddam one of the group leaders at the Molecular Tools unit at Uppsala University.

For more information, please contact: Di Wu tel: + 46 73-919 11 16, di.wu@vesicode.com
Masood Kamali-Moghaddam tel: +46 70-745 43 66, masood.kamali@igp.uu.se or Ulf Landegren tel: + 46 70-896 26 04, ulf.landegren@igp.uu.se

Wu et al. (2019) Profiling surface proteins on individual exosomes using a proximity barcoding assay, Nature Communications, DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-11486-1

Uppsala University -- quality, knowledge, and creativity since 1477
World-class research and outstanding education of global benefit to society, business, and culture.
Uppsala University is one of northern Europe's highest ranked academic institutions. www.uu.se

There is a growing demand for diagnostic markers for early disease detection and prognosis. Exosomes are potential biomarkers for cancer progression and neurodegenerative disease but it can be difficult to identify what tissue a specific exosome comes from. Researchers have solved this problem by developing a method that maps surface protein complements on large numbers of individual exosomes.

Read more »

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