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Networking can be a challenge for many scientists. 👩‍🔬

The pandemic has impacted networking for all generations of scientists, and virtual networking is all some young scientists have been able to experience. 

In case you're a scientist that finds networking particularly unpleasant, or an event organiser wondering how to make your events more accommodating, read on! 

Networking can start before the event takes place. 

1. Before you go to a work-related event, make a list of people likely to attend and with whom you'd like to meet. 

2. Clarify why you’d like to meet them and what you hope to learn from them. 

3. Alternatively, email some the people on your list beforehand to ask if they will be attending and let them know you’d be happy to meet them in person while there!

Simple goals for a networking event: 

Challenge yourself to stay at the event until you’ve accomplished at least one goal on your list. 

1. Make it a point to meet at least one person on your list, exchange contact info, and follow up with them later in the week. Is there someone on your list that would find what you’re working on/researching particularly useful? Have you ever collaborated with anyone important to them? Connect on these points.

2. Make sure whomever you are able to interact with understands your specialty and the industry you are in. What is your area of expertise in research? Are you most excited about a career in industry, academia, government, etc.?

3. Ensure everyone you’ve spoken with has a way to get in touch with you. Offer your business or contact card, exchange contact info on phones, or connect directly on LinkedIn.

References: 
- "Networking for introverted scientists" (Nature, 2019) by Ruth Gotian / @ruthgotian
- Personal experiences

#mentoringmatters #mentoringmondays #mondaymentoring #networkingforintroverts #introvertnetworking #scientistsnetworking #networkingtips #networking #science #scientists

Networking can be a challenge for many scientists. 👩‍🔬 The pandemic has impacted networking for all generations of scientists, and virtual networking is all some young scientists have been able to experience. In case you're a scientist that finds networking particularly unpleasant, or an event organiser wondering how to make your events more accommodating, read on! Networking can start before the event takes place. 1. Before you go to a work-related event, make a list of people likely to attend and with whom you'd like to meet. 2. Clarify why you’d like to meet them and what you hope to learn from them. 3. Alternatively, email some the people on your list beforehand to ask if they will be attending and let them know you’d be happy to meet them in person while there! Simple goals for a networking event: Challenge yourself to stay at the event until you’ve accomplished at least one goal on your list. 1. Make it a point to meet at least one person on your list, exchange contact info, and follow up with them later in the week. Is there someone on your list that would find what you’re working on/researching particularly useful? Have you ever collaborated with anyone important to them? Connect on these points. 2. Make sure whomever you are able to interact with understands your specialty and the industry you are in. What is your area of expertise in research? Are you most excited about a career in industry, academia, government, etc.? 3. Ensure everyone you’ve spoken with has a way to get in touch with you. Offer your business or contact card, exchange contact info on phones, or connect directly on LinkedIn. References: - "Networking for introverted scientists" (Nature, 2019) by Ruth Gotian / @ruthgotian - Personal experiences #mentoringmatters #mentoringmondays #mondaymentoring #networkingforintroverts #introvertnetworking #scientistsnetworking #networkingtips #networking #science #scientists

The Graphene Flagship celebrates a decade of 2D materials innovation

Funded by the European Commission in 2013, the Graphene Flagship has brought graphene innovation out of the lab and into commercial applications. Bringing diverse competencies from nearly 170 academic and industrial partners in 22 countries together, the Graphene Flagship facilitates cooperation between its partners, accelerating the timeline for industry acceptance of graphene technologies. With applications in everything from energy and transportation to electronics and biomedicine, graphene and other 2D materials are changing the way we live and work. The European Commission’s FET Flagships enable research projects on an unprecedented scale. With €1 billion budgets, the Graphene Flagship, Human Brain Project and Quantum Flagship serve as technology accelerators, helping Europe to compete with other global markets in research and innovation. With an additional €20 million investment, the European Commission has now funded the creation of an experimental pilot line for graphene-based electronics, optoelectronics and sensors.

Graphene Flagship