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Stroke charity’s Award set to benefit hundreds of stroke survivors

Press release -

Stroke charity’s Award set to benefit hundreds of stroke survivors

The Stroke Association in Scotland is planning to support hundreds more people affected by stroke as they recover from the effects of their stroke and impact of lockdown in the aftermath of the pandemic.

The charity has received a Lottery award from The National Lottery Community Fund to help develop and expand its peer support offers to help people affected by stroke, rebuild their lives again.

John Watson, Director Scotland of the Stroke Association said:

“As well as the physical disabilities caused by stroke, there are many other stroke related difficulties less visible but just as important. For example, a third of stroke survivors in Scotland will experience depression.

“We are delighted to be granted this award from The National Lottery Community Fund who has recognised the value of our support services and need for them to grow – particularly at this time. Our Recoveries At Risk survey last year highlighted that just under half of people affected by stroke felt less able to cope with the impact of their stroke during lockdown.

“In response to the pandemic, we are delivering new support offers in Scotland that aim to address the psychological impact of stroke – particularly the emotional needs of people affected by stroke.”

“We will use the funding to continue and expand the support options for people recovering from stroke throughout Scotland. That support will help stroke survivors connect with local groups, facilitate Zoom meetings, and run face to face support groups. They will also receive vital information to help with their own self-management.”

Heather Melville-Hume from Galashiels, was only 43 when she had her stroke two and a half years ago. It came completely out of the blue. In an instant, her life changed as she knew it.

Heather was unable to walk confidently or use her lower right arm and dominant hand. The fatigue that came after her stroke was overwhelming. Everything felt like a huge mountain to climb – both physically and emotionally.

And as if that wasn’t hard enough to deal with, Heather then lost her husband who she had been with for seven and a half years.

She said:

“Nobody around me had been widowed at such a young age and there was no one I knew my age, dealing with the impact of a stroke. I was in a very lonely place.”

Heather heard about the charity’s stroke café via social media. And although initially anxious to join online and talk to people, something made her do it.

“I was delighted to feel at first like I didn’t need to say anything. People were just talking normally about everyday things, and it was very relaxed with a warm welcome by volunteers involved. After a while people started to talk about what sort of a week they’d had. And that’s when I heard some fascinating stories about peoples’ stroke experiences and how they were coping/had coped. I realised I was not alone, that every stroke comes with its challenges, but there is hope and you can get back to a new normal.”

“I am delighted the Stroke Association in Scotland is receiving support from The National Lottery Community Fund. There is so much value in connecting with strangers with shared experiences in lifting your mood, spirit and importantly raise a smile on the hardest of days.”

The National Lottery Community Fund, Scotland Chair, Kate Still: said: “In these unprecedented times, it’s heartening to see the way Scottish communities are coming together to provide each other with support. I would like to congratulate the Stroke Association in Scotland on their award which is testament to the incredible efforts of their staff and volunteers. National Lottery players can be proud to know that the money they raise is making such a difference.”

Subjects


  • The Stroke Association in Scotland is part of a UK-wide a charity working to support people to rebuild their lives after stroke. We believe that everyone deserves to live the best life they can after stroke. From local support services and groups, to online information and support, anyone affected by stroke can visit stroke.org.uk or call our dedicated Stroke Helpline on 0303 3033 100 to find out about support available locally.
  • Our specialist support, research and campaigning are only possible with the courage and determination of the stroke community and the generosity of our supporters. With more donations and support, we can help rebuild even more lives.
  • · You can follow us on:
    Twitter: @StrokeScotland
    Facebook: StrokeAssociation - Scotland

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The UK's leading stroke charity helping people to rebuild their lives after stroke

The Stroke Association. We believe in life after stroke. That’s why we campaign to improve stroke care and support people to make the best possible recovery. It’s why we fund research to develop new treatments and ways to prevent stroke. The Stroke Association is a charity. We rely on your support to change lives and prevent stroke. Together we can conquer stroke.

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