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Five things we learned during Mumbrella360 Asia 2017

News   •   Nov 13, 2017 08:56 SGT

Our temporary green screen studio at Mumbrella 360 Asia 2017

Here are five things we learned during Mumbrella 360 Asia 2017, ending yesterday.

1. Record video – it helps to have cameras and a green screen studio like we did in our exhibition space, but there's really no reason why any delegate or speaker can't record their own. The event lives on in your content, long after everybody has packed up and gone home.

Here are some of the programmes we recorded at the event:

Interview with Andrew Vine, The Insight Bureau: The analogue of speakers in a digital world

Interview with Glenn van Zutphen, Van Media: Should Time Warner sell CNN?

Media Savvy with Mark Laudi: What to say in a sizzle video recorded by the organisers

Media Savvy with Mark Laudi: "I don't like how I look/sound"

Media Savvy with Mark Laudi: How to recover when you go blank during a presentation

Media Savvy with Mark Laudi: What to do if you're speaking to a half-empty room

Media Savvy with Mark Laudi: How to react if you are chased by a TV news crew

2. Learn to pitch – events are really all about networking, and while the content presented on stage is great, it is the new relationships you forge that have lasting value. You can increase the efficiency and value of your networking, simply by learning how to pitch your product, your service, your brand or yourself better.

Here are three examples of the pitches we recorded:

Ruth Moran, Aspire

Sam Lee, Taboola

Sam Chester, MarketOne International

3. Keep your exhibit active – most times, exhibitors exhibit in order to win new customers, but you have to give visitors to your booth something to do. Go beyond posters, banners and collateral. Create an activity that demonstrates what you do. Show, don't tell. In our case that was fairly straightforward because we had bright lights, cameras and a big green screen, and I realise that not everybody has a product or service that is so visual. But even if your product or service is hard to demonstrate, there are other ways you can get people to come to your exhibition space. Providing phone chargers is possibly the least involved but highest value display I have seen at a conference.

4. Ask more questions – imagine introducing yourself to 300 people at once. You can, just by asking a question during the plenary sessions or panel discussions.Preface your question with your name, company name and what you do. Ask a good question, and other delegates will seek you out after the session.

5. Bring name cards – do I really have to remind you? Given that events are all about networking, coming without your name cards or an insufficient quantity of name cards, is really poor. If you really left them in the office, offer to link in with the person you're speaking to.

(Watch me make these points in our live webcast from the event yesterday.).

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