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29 MILLION DRIVERS PREDICT THEY’ll HAVE A CAR CRASH AND IT WILL BE SOMEBODY ELSE’S FAULT

Press release   •   Feb 27, 2014 12:01 GMT

·  That includes the four in ten motorists who have already had a car crash!

·  Yet only 7% of drivers believe more driver training is the answer

New research reveals that ‘Accident Anxiety’ is prevalent on Britain’s roads, with 79% of drivers describing themselves as worried about driving – hardly surprising with 29 million feeling a crash is just around the corner.

According to new research released by Allianz Insurance today, this ‘Accident Anxiety’ is mostly caused by tailgating (45%), aggressive ‘road rage’ behaviour (41%) and uninsured drivers (29%), which together are responsible for killing 130 people and injuring a further 26,500 every year2.

In fact ‘Accident Anxiety’ is so great that 17% of drivers have opted out of making a journey because of their driving worries.

The research finds that 81% of drivers say that they have been involved in car accidents that were not their fault. And after experiencing a collision, one in five motorists (22%) reveal that they feel more worried, more stressed and less confident behind the wheel yet just 7% think that more driver training will solve the problem.

Jon Dye, CEO of Allianz Insurance said: “It’s worrying to see that so many motorists feel they will have an accident, and yet so few feel more driver training would help. Drivers can only drive at their best if they feel calm and alert and not unduly worried about what other motorists are getting up to.

“Tailgating, ‘road rage’ and uninsured drivers can all cause accidents and contribute to the claims costs faced by insurers at a time when the industry is looking to bring down premiums in a sensible way for customers.” 

James Gibson, of Road Safety GB, said: “The Allianz research shows that ‘Accident Anxiety’ is prevalent among the drivers surveyed. Actions like tailgating and aggressive driving behaviour can be particularly intimidating. Motorists need to find ways of coping with the actions of others when they get behind the wheel.

“The best advice is not to react to the aggressive and inconsiderate behaviour of others as this can cause a collision. If you are being tailgated it is best to recognise that some drivers are intent on overtaking and the best way to deal with this is to simply allow them to pass when it’s safe to do so. It can be useful to think about the things that cause you stress and anxiety and develop strategies to cope before you start a journey.”

The Allianz Insurance research also shows:

  • Drivers aged 35 to 44-years-old are the most affected by ‘Accident Anxiety ’ with 83% having experienced this feeling in some way
  • An accident is more likely to affect women’s driving style (27%) than that of male motorists (17%).

To find out more please visit: https://www.allianz.co.uk

Notes to Editors

1 - (Headline) Number of full car driving license holders in the UK in 2012 = 35,845,557

.  35,845,557/100 x 80.4 = 28,819,827 https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/nts02-driving-licence-holders

2 – Motor Insurance Bureau statistics August 2013

About the research

Omnibus research was conducted between 07-10.02.14 with 1,000 respondents who drive regularly.

About Allianz

Allianz Insurance is one of the largest general insurers in the UK and part of the Allianz SE Group, one of the leading integrated financial services providers worldwide and the largest property and casualty insurer in the world.  With approximately 142,000 employees worldwide, the Allianz Group serves approximately 78 million customers in more than 70 countries.

The mission of Allianz Insurance is to be the outstanding competitor in our chosen markets by delivering products and services that out clients recommend, being a great company to work for and achieving the best combination of profit and growth.

 

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