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​Stroke Association launches new project to improve wellbeing in Preston

Press release -

​Stroke Association launches new project to improve wellbeing in Preston

The Stroke Association in Preston is celebrating after being awarded a grant of National Lottery funding to launch a new project: Active Lives After Stroke in the area. The charity has been awarded £213,620 to support four projects across England.

The grant, awarded through Sport England, will support stroke survivors in becoming and staying more active after their stroke.

The project launched on Wednesday 23 January at Heartbeat in Preston, when stroke survivors came together with Stroke Association staff and partners, to celebrate the new support in the area.

Father of three, Jonathan Webster, 53 from Tarleton, is taking part in the programme. Jonathan had a life changing stroke in March 2017, which left him in intensive care and recovering hospital for seven months. Initially his family were told to prepare for the worst. Jonathan’s stroke affected his speech and his short term memory and has left him with right sided weakness.

He said: “Before my stroke I cycled, walked our dogs every day and played golf regularly. Now everyone tells me my movement in my right side won’t come back to any great degree, but I’m determined to make it as strong as possible. I want to be able to walk more and strengthen my leg. There’s lots I’d like to do and the reality is I don’t know if I’ll get there, but I’m hoping this project will help me.”

Laura Coleman, Volunteering and Community Officer for the Stroke Association said: “A stroke can happen to anyone, at any age, at any time and it turns lives upside down in an instant. For some people the effects of a stroke may be relatively minor and may not last long, while others may be left with more serious long-term problems.

“We all know being active is important. We also know it can be daunting getting active again after a stroke. This new project is here to help local stroke survivors get back into being active at their own pace with other stroke survivors. Being active can improve both your physical and mental wellbeing. It could help lower your blood pressure and cholesterol levels, increase muscle strength and flexibility and reduce feelings of anxiety and depression.

“Active Lives After Stroke is a project funded by Sport England to support stroke survivors to become active and stay active through peer support groups. Sessions are designed with stroke survivors to get people moving in a fun and friendly environment. We work with local activity providers and make sure all abilities are included in the sessions.”

The Stroke Association is one of eight Richmond Group of Charities that Sport England is supporting with a total of £1.3 million of National Lottery funding to launch unique pilot projects to help prevent and manage long-term health conditions and enable people to be more active.

Sport England's Executive Director, Mike Diaper, said: “Support groups like this one in Preston play an important role in increasing and maintaining levels of physical activity amongst stroke survivors while at the same time helping them self-manage their condition.

“The learnings we will gain from the project will be extremely valuable and used to benefit even more people with long-term health conditions across the country.”

The Richmond Group of Charities is a coalition of 14 of the leading health and social care organisations in the voluntary sector which works together to influence health and social care policy and practice.”

The Richmond Group of Charities is a coalition of 14 of the leading health and social care organisations in the voluntary sector.

If you’re a stroke survivor or carer and want to find out more information about joining Active Lives After Stroke, please contact Laura Coleman on laura.coleman@stroke.org.uk or 07764 905 073. The project is also looking for volunteers, so if you can spare time to support Active Lives After Stroke please get in touch.

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  • A stroke is a brain attack which happens when the blood supply to the brain is cut off, caused by a clot or bleeding in the brain. There are more than 100,000 strokes in the UK each year; that is around one stroke every five minutes. There are over 1.2 million people in the UK living with the effects of stroke. 
  • Stroke Association is a charity. We believe in life after stroke and together we can conquer stroke. We work directly with stroke survivors and their families and carers, with health and social care professionals and with scientists and researchers. We campaign to improve stroke care and support people to make the best recovery they can. We fund research to develop new treatments and ways of preventing stroke. The Stroke Helpline (0303 303 3100) provides information and support on stroke. More information can be found at www.stroke.org.uk
  • Press contacts

    Angela Macleod

    Angela Macleod

    Press contact Communications Officer Scotland press and Stroke Association research communications 0131 555 7244
    Laura Thomas

    Laura Thomas

    Press contact Communications Officer Wales 07776508594

    Scott Weddell

    Press contact PR Manager Stroke policy, and Northern Ireland activities 02075661528
    Ken Scott

    Ken Scott

    Press contact Press Officer North of England and Midlands 0115 778 8429
    Daisy Dighton

    Daisy Dighton

    Press contact Press Officer London and East of England 02079401358
    Martin Oxley

    Martin Oxley

    Press contact Press Officer South of England 0207 566 1548
    Sokina Miah

    Sokina Miah

    Press contact PR Manager Fundraising and local services 0207 566 0337
    Katie Taylor

    Katie Taylor

    Press contact Head of PR & Media This team is not responsible for booking marketing materials or advertising
    Out of hours contact

    Out of hours contact

    Press contact Media queries 07799 436008

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    The UK's leading stroke charity helping people to rebuild their lives after stroke

    The Stroke Association. We believe in life after stroke. That’s why we campaign to improve stroke care and support people to make the best possible recovery. It’s why we fund research to develop new treatments and ways to prevent stroke. The Stroke Association is a charity. We rely on your support to change lives and prevent stroke. Together we can conquer stroke.

    Stroke Association
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    EC1V 2PR London
    UK